Atlantic Tales: Or, Pictures of Youth (Google eBook)

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Munroe & Francis, 1833 - 314 pages
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Page 105 - ... in their lessons. By degrees, and by giving her only a very little to learn at a time, and by having constantly before her such good examples as Adelaide and Rosalind, she entirely conquered her love of idleness. She was really not deficient in natural capacity, and she soon began to take pleausure in trying to improve herself; so that when she returned to Maryland, she carried with her a newly acquired taste for rational pursuits, which she never afterwards lost. Sister Mary sat silent for a...
Page 95 - ... desire it perhaps I may protract the indulgence to a longer period. Rosalind. Dear Mrs. Mortlake, how kind you are! When shall my happiness begin? As to-morrow is Saturday, when we always have a half-holiday, and next day Sunday, when we go to the city to attend church, I think, notwithstanding my impatience, I would rather commence my week of felicity' regularly on Monday morning. Mrs. Mortlake. Very well, then : on Monday morning let it be. Adelaide. I am sorry to hear you call...
Page 86 - Josephine appeared to get through the morning rather contentedly. " The afternoon was again devoted to a long nap ; and in the evening Josephine reclined on the front parlour sofa, and entertained herself by running her finger a hundred times over the brass nails. " Several days passed on in a similar manner. One morning, when they were all in the playroom, Josephine said to her cousins, 'What a very hard life you are obliged to endure. Neither of you have a moment of rest from the time you leave...
Page 89 - Rosalind ; so true it is, that " evil communication corrupts good manners," and she was seized with an earnest desire to participate in the happiness of doing nothing. " Next morning Rosalind went to her lessons with great reluctance ; and, consequently, did not "perform them well. On the following day she was equally deficient ; and, in the afternoon, when Josephine went up stairs to take her nap, Rosalind, looking after her exclaimed, " Happy girl, how I envy her !" "Envy her!" said Adelaide; of...
Page 89 - Rosalind. She is not troubled with lessons and sewing as we are. She can do whatever she pleases the whole day long. No wonder she is fat, when she is so perfectly comfortable. For my part, I expect, in the course of another year, to be worn to a skeleton with such incessant application. Adelaide. But without application how is it possible to learn ? Rosalind. I would rather put off my learning till I am older, and have strength to bear such dreadful fatigue. Adelaide. I do not find...
Page 76 - I see the smoke of the steam-boat, just behind CastleWilliams. My father and Josephine will soon be here. I am glad my drawing is so nearly completed. In a few minutes it will be finished.' " And in a few minutes," said Rosalind, " I shall conclude the story that I am reading." " Do you not now think," asked Mrs, Mortlake, " I was right in proposing that we should protract our usual afternoon occupations an hour beyond the usual time, as we are expecting the arrival of your father and your cousin...
Page 78 - ... wharf. Here they come. There is my father ; and it must be Josephine that is with him ! ' " The sisters then ran down the steps of the portico, and in a moment were at the landing-place, where Mr. Edington, as soon as he had assisted her to step on shore, introduced them to Josephine Sherborough, a fat, fair, pale young lady, about fourteen, with a remarkably placid countenance, which immediately won the regard of Rosalind, who determined in her own mind that Josephine was a very sweet girl,...
Page 81 - ... arbour, she established herself on a circular bench which ran round a large walnut-tree, and then she counted all the windows at the back part of the house. When this was accomplished, she counted them all over again; and then, finding the sun had become very powerful, she went into the front parlour, the shutters of which were bowed to exclude the heat; and, throwing herself at full length on the sofa, she, in a few minutes, fell into a profound sleep, from which she did not awake till her cousins...
Page 77 - ... In a short time Adelaide exclaimed, ' Here is the steam-boat ! I see they are putting several trunks into the little boat at the side. And now it is let down to the water. And now a gentleman and young lady descend the steps, and take their seats in it. How fast it cuts its way through the water. In a moment it will touch the wharf. Here they come. There is my father ; and it must be Josephine that is with him ! ' " The sisters then ran down the steps of the portico, and in a moment were at the...
Page 83 - ... prepared for a walk, and invited Josephine to join them. This she did, but, in less than ten minutes, she complained so much of fatigue, that Rosalind turned back and accompanied her home, and she reclined on the settee in the porch till the lamps were lighted in the front parlour. The girls then shewed Josephine a portable diorama, containing twelve beautiful coloured views of castles, abbeys, temples, and mountain scenery. Each of these exquisite little landscapes was fixed in turn as the back...

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