The Normal Child and Primary Education (Google eBook)

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Ginn, 1912 - Education - 342 pages
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Page 123 - THERE was a child went forth every day, And the first object he look'd upon, that object he became, And that object became part of him for the day or a certain part of the day, Or for many years or stretching cycles of years.
Page 206 - The Swing How do you like to go up in a swing, Up in the air so blue? Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing Ever a child can do!
Page 123 - The early lilacs became part of this child, And grass and white and red morning-glories, and white and red clover, and the song of the phoebe-bird, And the Third-month lambs and the sow's pink-faint litter, and the mare's foal and the cow's calf, And the noisy brood of the barnyard or by the mire of the pondside, And the fish suspending themselves so curiously below there, and the beautiful curious liquid, And the water-plants with their graceful flat heads, all became part of him.
Page 123 - The mother at home quietly placing the dishes on the suppertable, The mother with mild words, clean her cap and gown, a wholesome odor falling off her person and clothes as she walks by...
Page 123 - ... astern, The hurrying tumbling waves, quick-broken crests, slapping, The strata of color'd clouds, the long bar of maroon-tint away solitary by itself, the spread of purity it lies motionless in, The horizon's edge, the flying sea-crow, the fragrance of salt marsh and shore mud, These became part of that child who went forth every day, and who now goes, and will always go forth every day.
Page 123 - His own parents . . he that had propelled the fatherstuff at night, and fathered him . . and she that conceived him in her womb and birthed him .... they gave this child more of themselves than that, They gave him afterward every day .... they and of them became part of him.
Page 118 - Lead your child out into Nature, teach him on the hilltops and in the valleys. There he will listen better, and the sense of freedom will give him more strength to overcome difficulties. But in these hours of freedom let him be taught by Nature rather than by you. Let him fully realize that she is the real teacher and that you, with your art, do nothing more than walk quietly at her side. Should a bird sing...
Page 113 - ... it may not lodge some happy creature. The meadow brook undoes its icy fetters with rippling notes, gurgles, and runs free. And all this is wrought in less than two months to the music of nature's orchestra, in the midst of balmy incense. The thousand soft, voices of the earth have truly found their way to me the small rustle in tufts of grass, the silky swish of leaves, the buzz of insects, the hum of bees in blossoms I / have plucked, the flutter of a bird's wings after his bath, and the...
Page 328 - The question thus pointedly put is the fundamental one in a critical estimate of a system professedly developed from biological principles. Dr. Theodate Smith, of Clark University, in an account of the workings of the system as witnessed by her in the Montessori schools at Rome, says: If one visits one of Dr. Montessori's schools the children all seem to be occupied in Interesting play. Some are lying on the floor playing with blocks or strips of wood painted in different colors. Some are playing...
Page 114 - Hast thou seen his mind grow, Like the running dawn, to grasp The vision of the Master? It was the miracle of inward sight. In the realms of wonderment where I dwell I explore life with my hands; I recognize, and am happy ; My fingers are ever athirst for the earth, And drink up its wonders with delight, Draw out earth's dear delights ; My feet are charged with the murmur, The throb, of all things that grow. This is touch, this quivering, This flame, this ether, This glad rush of blood, This daylight...

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