Dulwich College and Edward Alleyn: A Short History of the Foundation of God's Gift College at Dulwich. Together with a Memoir of the Founder (Google eBook)

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E. W. Allen, 1877 - Dulwich College - 136 pages
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Page 112 - God, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following. That is to say First and Principally I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God...
Page 112 - Mind the Mortality of my Body, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament...
Page 66 - ... more of inheritance for their children ; and now the youth (who yet knows nothing of his father's intention nor mine) flies from his resolutions for that calling, and importunes his father to let him travel. The girl knows not her loss, for I never told her of it; but, truly, it is a great disappointment to me.
Page 83 - May, in the sixteenth year of our Reign, of England, France and Ireland; and of Scotland the one and fiftieth.
Page 65 - ... the breakfastroom window. It was there that, besides my familiar friends, I met some whom I was glad to see after many years' acquaintance through books. It was there that I met Southey, when he had almost left off coming to London. He was then indeed hardly fit for society. It was in the interval between the death of his first wife and his second marriage. He was gentle, kindly and agreeable; and well disposed to talk of old Norwich, and many things besides. But there was a mournful expression...
Page 112 - Redeemer, in whom, and by whose merits, I only trust to be saved, and made partaker of everlasting life : and my body I will to the earth, from whence it came, without any vain funeral pomp or show, to be interred in the quire of that chapel, which God of his goodness hath caused me to erect...
Page 21 - ... with those little ebullitions when they escaped him in argument with some sciolist, or some every-day politician whose whole knowledge of his subject was picked up in the clubs, or gathered from the papers of the morning, or at best gleaned from the recent volumes of the ' Parliamentary Debates.' If it be asked what was the peculiar merit, the characteristic excellence of Mr. Allen's understanding, the answer is not difficult to make. It was the rare faculty of combining general views with details...
Page 22 - Millar ; and with the minute observation of facts and weighing of evidence which we trace through the luminous and picturesque pages of Robertson and Gibbon. He for whom no theory was too abstract, no speculation too general, could so far stoop to the details of practical statesmanship as to give a friend, proceeding for the first time on a delicate and important mission, this sound advice : " Don't ever appear anxious about any point, either in arguing to convince those you are treating with,...
Page 66 - Tell both your daughters a piece of a story of my Con., which may accustom them to endure disappointments in this world: An honourable person (whose name I give you in a schedule to burn, lest this letter should be mislaid) had an intention to give her one of his sons, and had told it me, and would have been content to accept what I, by my friends, could have begged for her; but he intended that son to my profession, and had provided him already ^300...
Page 68 - ... then a promise.* Thus past itt on till the begining of your sicknesse, and then you desire our maryag should be performd with as much speed as might bee ; for as you sayd the world tooke surer knowledge of itt, and for what wase promisd on your part, iff god lent you lyfe should be really performd.f I directly went on, urging you to nothing, but rested wholy on your bare word (which I then thowght 10 tymes the valew could not make you breake). Itt is now allmoste 3 quarters sine our maryag :...

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