One-dimensional Man: Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society

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Beacon Press, 1964 - History - 260 pages
59 Reviews
Originally published in 1964, One-Dimensional Man quickly became one of the most important texts in the ensuing decade of radical political change. This second edition, newly introduced by Marcuse scholar Douglas Kellner, presents Marcuse's best-selling work to another generation of readers in the context of contemporary events.

"Marcuse shows himself to be one of the most radical and forceful thinkers of this time." —The Nation
  

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Review: One-Dimensional Man: Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society

User Review  - sologdin - Goodreads

well-known marx-freud synthesis. notable for the convergence of east and west in their telos, despite the ostensible distinctions in their respective arche. Read full review

Review: One-Dimensional Man: Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society

User Review  - Philip - Goodreads

Ideological Consumerism: Contemporary Reflections on One Dimensional Man by Herbert Marcuse Over fifty years ago the Marxist philosopher Herbert Marcuse published the book that made his name, One ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The New Forms of Control
1
The Closing of the Political Universe
19
The Conquest of the Unhappy Consciousness Repressive Desublimation
56
The Closing of the Universe of Discourse
84
OneDimensional Thought
121
Negative Thinking The Defeated Logic of Protest
123
From Negative to Positive Thinking Technological Rationality and the Logic of Domination
144
The Triumph of Positive Thinking OneDimensional Philosophy
170
The Chance of the Alternatives
201
The Historical Commitment of Philosophy
203
The Catastrophe of Liberation
225
Conclusion
247
Index
259
Copyright

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Page xlvii - (1) that advanced industrial society is capable of containing qualitative change for the foreseeable future; (2) that forces and tendencies exist which may break this containment and explode the society. I do not think that a clear answer can be given. Both tendencies are there, side by side—and even the one in the other.
Page xlviii - In the face of the totalitarian features of this society, the traditional notion of the “neutrality” of technology can no longer be maintained. Technology as such cannot be isolated from the use to which it is put; the technological society is a system of domination which operates already in the concept and construction of techniques. The
Page xxxiii - will vacillate throughout between two contradictory hypotheses: (1) that advanced industrial society is capable of containing qualitative change for the foreseeable future; (2) that forces and tendencies exist which may break this containment and explode the society

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About the author (1964)

Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979) was born in Berlin and educated at the universities of Berlin and Freiburg. He fled Germany in 1933 and arrived in the United States in 1934. Marcuse taught at Columbia, Harvard, Brandeis, and the University of California, San Diego, where he met Andrew Feenberg and William Leiss as graduate students. He is the author of numerous books, including One-Dimensional Man and Eros and Civilization.

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