Shakespeare's Library: A Collection of the Plays, Romances, Novels, Poems, and Histories Employed by Shakespeare in the Composition of His Works, Page 2, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Reeves and Turner, 1875
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Page 102 - I have no brother, I am like no brother; And this word 'love,' which greybeards call divine, Be resident in men like one another, And not in me! I am myself alone.
Page 122 - Windsor, thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me and make me my lady thy wife.
Page 486 - A Pleasant Conceited Historie called the Taming of a Shrew, as it was sundry times acted by the Right honorable the Earle of Pembrook his servants...
Page 108 - A Most pleasaunt and excellent conceited Comedie, of Syr lohn Falstaffe, and the merrie Wiues of Windsor. Entermixed with sundrie variable and pleasing humors, of Syr Hugh the Welch Knight, Justice Shallow, and his wise Cousin M. Slender. With the swaggering vaine of Auncient Pistoll, and Corporall Nym.
Page 306 - The True Chronicle History of King Leir and his three Daughters, Gonorill, Ragan, and Cordelia. As it hath been diuers and sundry times lately acted.
Page 29 - But we are spirits of another sort. I with the morning's love have oft made sport ; And, like a forester, the groves may tread, Even till the eastern gate, all fiery-red, Opening on Neptune with fair blessed beams, Turns into yellow gold his salt green streams.
Page 2 - The true Tragedie of Richard Duke of Yorke, and the death of good King Henrie the Sixt, with the whole contention betweene the two Houses Lancaster and Yorke, as it was sundrie times acted by the Right Honourable the Earle of Pembrooke his seruants. Printed at London by PS for Thomas Millington, and are to be sold at his shoppe vnder Saint Peters Church in Cornwal. 1595.
Page 25 - Shakespeare," vi. 291, In several other places, all the editors of Shakespeare, from the time of Rowe, have misunderstood the word. It would not be difficult to supply instances. Let the following suffice : " O ! that this too-too solid flesh would melt, Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew.
Page 26 - The want thereof makes thee abhominable. Thou art as opposite to euerie good, As the Antipodes are vnto vs, * Or as the south to the Septentrion. Oh Tygers hart wrapt in a womans hide ? How couldst thou draine the life bloud of the childe.
Page 135 - Shakspeare no harm. He is a stout man at quarter-staff,, and single falchion, though, as I am told, a halting fellow ; and he stood, they say, a tough fight with the rangers of old Sir Thomas 320 Lucy of Charlecot, when he broke his deer-park and kissed his keeper's daughter.

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