Daily Life During the Spanish Inquisition (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 2002 - History - 290 pages
1 Review

The life of persecuted minorities, as well as that of the wealthy and the ordinary people of Spain during the Spanish Inquisition, comes alive in this illuminating account. For three and a half centuries, the Inquisition permeated every aspect of daily life in early modern Spain. This history depicts in graphic terms the dangers faced by Jews and Muslims and their suffering at the hands of the Inquisitors, as well as the struggle for survival of the lower classes and the ostentatious display of wealth of the high nobility. Set against the political, religious, social, economic, and cultural events of the time, it presents a balanced account, rich in detail, of the daily activities of the Spanish people during this period.

Each chapter offers a succinct perspective of life during early modern Spain, covering the political and social setting, the Church, the Inquisition, Jews and Conversos, Muslims and Moriscos, the court, urban and rural life, family life, clothes and fashions, food, arts and entertainment, military life, education, and health and medicine. All these aspects of life are discussed in the context of a society experiencing profound internal conflicts arising from matters of religion, class, gender, and ethnic prejudice. Interwoven in the text is a discussion of relevant political and economic events that helped to shape the times, as well as comments from both contemporary Spanish writers and foreign visitors who witnessed firsthand the conditions and attitudes of the people. More than 40 illustrations, a timeline of important events, a list of Spanish rulers during the centuries of the Inquisition, a glossary, and a bibliography add value to the narrative.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Daily Life During the Spanish Inquisition

User Review  - Greynomad - Goodreads

Well written, enjoyable .................. Read full review

Contents

2 Political Setting
17
3 Social Setting
31
4 The Church
47
5 The Inquisition
61
6 Jews and Conversos
87
7 Muslims and Moriscos
105
8 The Court
121
9 Urban Life
133
13 Food
183
14 Arts and Entertainment
197
15 Military Life
219
16 Education
237
17 Health and Medicine
253
Rulers of Spain During the Inquisition
273
Sources of Information
275
Glossary
279

10 Rural Life
147
11 Family Life
159
12 Clothes and Fashions
169

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 14 - ... and you must be in some considerable town to find four or five of them, for in other places there are none, no more than there are forks. They have only a cup in the house ; and if the mule-drivers get first hold of it, which commonly happens, if they please (for they are served with more respect than those whom they bring), you must stay patiently till they have done with it or drink out of an earthen pitcher.
Page 15 - ... I think there cannot be a better representation of Hell than these sort of kitchens and the persons in them ; for not to speak of this horrible smoke, which blinds and chokes one, there are a dozen of men and as many women blacker than devils, nasty and stinking like swine, and clad like beggars. There are always some of 'em impudently grating on a sorry guitar, and singing like a cat a-roa sting. The women have all of 'em their hair about their ears, and you would take 'em for Bedlamites ; they...
Page 13 - ... go up is very strait, and does rather resemble a sorry ladder. La Seignora de la Casa receives you with her gown tucked up and her dangling sleeves ; she takes time to put on her Sunday clothes while you get out of your litter, and she never omits this, for they are all very poor and vainglorious. You are showed a chamber whose walls are white enough, hung with a thousand little scurvy pictures of saints...

References to this book

About the author (2002)

James M. Anderson is Professor Emeritus of the University of Calgary, Canada. He has spent many years in Spain and Portugal both as a Fulbright Scholar and as the recipient of Canada Council and SSHRC grants, contributing numerous articles and books to the field of Iberian studies. He is author of eleven books, including The History of Portugal (Greenwood, 2000).

Bibliographic information