Public papers of Daniel D. Tompkins, governor of New York, 1807-1817, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Wynkoop Hallenbeck Crawford Co., State Printers, 1902 - New York (State)
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Contents

James Boyd Applicant for an Army Commission
48
Ordnance Supplies for Albany and Plaster of Paris for Firing
53
Two Thirtytwo Pounders for New York
60
Troops Selected for the NarrowsThe Governor Thinks it Unwise
66
The Governor Lays Down the Law to Officers Who Neglect Their
72
To Governor GalushaNew York and Vermont Boundary Line
74
Mr Blakeslee to Supply a Substitute if Personal Service is
80
Captain Joseph Nelson Informed That His Command Will Handle
86
Major Skinner Ordered to Inspect Northern Arsenals
89
Major Packard Called to Account for Failure to Obey Orders
95
Dodges Brigade Slow in AdvancingReinforcements for Sacket
101
The Governor Portrays to General Porter Some of the Disadvan
105
Sizers Battery Ordered to Utlca Thence to Sacket Harbor
112
Relating to Colonel Van Wycks Detached Regiment
118
Mr Spencer Appointed Adjutant of Colonel Douglass Regiment
124
The Governor Assumes the Responsibility of Relieving General
126
Judge Parker Recommended as a Judge Advocate
132
Reinforcements Expected at Sacket Harbor
139
The Governor to Major Aycrigg in Regard to the Formation of
143
Methods of Promotion in the Militia
151
To General Brown in Regard to the General Situation Along
160
Delinquent Militia to be Disciplined
165
The Governor to General BrownState Muskets Indiscriminately
171
The Governor Suggests to General Smyth the Necessity for
177
The Governor Directs the Transfer of Ordnance Supplies to
183
The Governor in Quest of Information Relative to Payment
188
Relating to the Payment of TroopsThe Governor Favors Gen
194
The Governors Exhaustive Opinion on the Question of Calling
200
The Governor to Major Rapalje in the Matter of the Command
206
Captain MacPherson Desires a Field Position
212
Field Officers of the Militia to be Withdrawn from Ogdensburgh
216
The Seventyfive Thousand Dollar Draft on the War Department
222
The Governor to General Dodge on a Military Technicality
231
A Strong Indorsement for Mr Herkimers Application for a Colo
239
A Complaint Against the Bridgewater Post Office
249
To General Dearborn in Relation to the Medical Corps
255
Major Wiggins Called Upon to Account for all State Property
256
The State Asks the Federal Government What Provisions Are
262
LieutenantColonel Winchells Resignation AcceptedPromotion
270
Recommendations for Navy Commissions
276
For the Protection of New YorkGovernor Tompkins Estimates
282
Distribution of Muskets and Arms
290
The Governors Detailed Statement as to Distribution of Arms
296
In Regard to Accounts of Mr William Hewes
352
The Governor Answers a Number of Questions of General Piatts
354
Why the Governor Disapproves of Colonel Constants Hesignation 380
360
Arms Distributed in Lewis County
367
General MClure Ordered to BuffaloThe Governors Minute
373
The Governor Suggests General Porter to General Wilkinson
379
The Governor Hopeful that General Wilkinson will Overcome Pre
382
Lieutenant Baker Ordered to Plattsburgh and Receives Necessary
388
Two Hundred of General Roses Command Ordered to Sag Harbor
392
The Governor Suggests a Block House at the Westerly Point
398
Fort Niagara CapturedTogether with an Immense Quantity
405
The Governor Reports the Condition of Affairs to President Mad
411
The Situation at Sag Harbor Involves a Difference of Opinion 413416
413
The Governor Insists Upon a Counter Stroke Against Canada
419
The Governor to Chancellor John Lansing in Regard to a Council
425
Reply of the Senate to the Governors Speech
432
The Governor Acknowledges a Flattering Production from Tames
438
The Governor Appeals to the Secretary of War to Expedite
444
Captain Chases Effort to Ratee a Cavalry Company Crushed
452
Accounts with a Dash of Politics and War
459
To General GainesDispositions for the Protection of the North
465
To Mr Secretary Armstrong in Regard to the Frontier of
471
Views of General Swift
477
To Major General LewisA Heavy Detachment of Troops
481
A Requisition for One Thousand Muskets
487
General Lewis Troops Ordered to March in Five Days
495
Abstract of Military Stores at and for New York Exclusive
501
The Governor Loyal to His Own Officers 652
552
To Mr Secretary MonroeThe Legislature Willing to Go to
558
To General WidrigThe Presidents Authority Over the Militia
564
The Governor Requests the Legislature to Adjust a Few Unex
570
Governor Tompkins Formally Assumes Command of the Third
576
AdjutantGeneral Fenwick Complimented for the Success of
605
Colonel James B Murray Presents the Governor with a Set
611
The Governor Forwards Five Thousand Dollars on Account of
617
To Colonel FrelinghuysenAcknowledging the Services of
622
General Ripley Remembered in Like Manner
628
To General BoydRegarding the Rank and Pay of William
637
The Governor Acknowledges the Receipt of a Sword Belt from
639
The Governor Congratulates the Legislature on the Termination
645
National PoliticsTo Congressman Betts the Governor Intimates
653
Reply of the Assembly 689
659

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 74 - Wool, be and are hereby appointed Commissioners, on the part of this State, to meet Commissioners from other States, in the City of Washington, on the...
Page 204 - States, and if any doubt should arise, not explained by said articles, then according to your conscience, the best of your understanding, and the custom of war in like cases...
Page 187 - That if any person, whether officer or soldier, belonging to the militia of any state, and called out into the service of the United States, be wounded or disabled while in actual service, he shall be taken care of and provided for at the public expense.
Page 272 - Tawcumegoqua, each, six hundred and forty acres of land, to be located at and near the grand traverse of the Flint river, in such manner as the President of the United States may direct.
Page 650 - ... upon our constituents. The first route being an object common with the states of the west, we may rely on their zealous co-operation in any judicious plan that can perfect the water communication in that direction. As it relates to the connecting the waters of the Hudson with those of Lake Champlain, we may with equal confidence, count on the same spirited exertions of the patriotic and enterprising state of Vermont.
Page 204 - You, AB, do swear that you will well and truly try and determine, according to evidence, the matter now before you, between the United States of America and the prisoner to be tried, and that you will duly administer justice, according to the provisions of ' An act establishing Rules and Articles for the government of the armies of the United States...
Page 565 - Indian tribe, it shall be lawful for the President of the United States to call forth such number of the militia of the state or states most convenient to the place of danger or scene of action, as he may judge necessary to repel such invasion ; and to issue his orders for that purpose to such officer or officers of the militia as he shall think proper.
Page 649 - It will rest with the legislature, whether the prospect of connecting the waters of the Hudson with those of the Western Lakes and of Champlain, is not sufficiently important to...
Page 548 - ... conflagration of those monuments of art which public spirit and munificence had erected, and which were consecrated by the name of their illustrious founder, he has kindled a flame of patriotism which pervades every section of the union, which has already lit the way to his...
Page 642 - ... hour of battle you were found with your command in the ranks of the regiment to which you were attached, bravely contending for the imperishable honors of the victory. The invaders being expelled, you quietly returned, with your small but patriotic troop, to the duties of your sacred calling, and there inculcated by precept those principles of morality, patriotism, and piety, of 'which you had just given a practical demonstration. At a period, Sir, when principles inconsistent with what we owe...

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