Killing the Giants: The Road to Nihilism

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Outskirts Press, 2009 - Fiction - 326 pages
1 Review
President Woodrow Wilson once wrote, "Some of the biggest men in the United States, in the field of commerce and manufacture[ing], are afraid of something. They know that there is a power somewhere so organized, so subtle, so watchful, so interlocked, so complete, so pervasive, that they better not speak above their breath when they speak in condemnation of it." [Wilson]
"Killing the Giants" is a story about the powers that continue to silently rule the United States today.
After a series of deadly events at two oil facilities, the ATF sends Sarah Perkins to investigate. The ensuing investigation takes her to New York City, Grande Isle Louisiana, and Chapleaux Ontario where she meets Blake, a hard-line union leader, and his quirky friend Dennis. While investigating the alleged multi-national crimes, Sarah finds herself in a web of corporate and political subterfuge. In their search for truth and justice, Blake, Sarah, and Dennis land in the center of a global conspiracy underwritten by Caesar, an evil secret society bent on global dominance and totalitarian rule. Although Caesar is well versed in human nature, the pride and arrogance of its members eventually leave them vulnerable to the skill sets of the working class.
Wrought with lovable and humorous personalities, the story comes to life as the characters experience the consequences of an elitist global agenda. From beginning to end, Killing the Giants delves into the evolving story of how the characters navigate through the tragedy of losing everything they hold dear, to the misfortune of being common.

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Review: Killing the Giants: The Road to Nihilism

User Review  - Carol - Goodreads

The writing style is pedantic and stilted. The story might be good but I skipped vast portions of it - especially all of the quoted speeches from presidents' past and even the preamble to the constitution. At 99 cents for kindle it is too much. Read full review

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