Political Opinion in Massachusetts During Civil War and Reconstruction, Volume 74, Issue 2 (Google eBook)

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Columbia Univerity, 1916 - Massachusetts - 219 pages
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Page 311 - ... in any spirit of oppression, or for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, or purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights of established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired, and that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 311 - Congress, banishing all feelings of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country ; that this war is not waged on their part in any spirit of oppression, or for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, or purpose of overthrowing or interfering •with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution, and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired...
Page 318 - ASSOCIATION 1. The condition of membership shall be absolute and unqualified loyalty to the Government of the United States, and unwavering support to its efforts for the suppression of the Rebellion. 2. The primary object of the Association shall be to discountenance and rebuke, by moral and social influences, all disloyalty to the Federal Government, and to that end the members will use every proper means in public and private.
Page 228 - That it is the duty of the Federal Government, in all its departments, to protect, when necessary, the rights of persons and property in the Territories, and wherever else its constitutional authority extends.
Page 241 - They break the links of Union: shall we light The fires of hell to weld anew the chain On that red anvil where each blow is pain?
Page 339 - Constitution, while the treason which it involves still further works an instant forfeiture of all those functions and powers essential to the continued existence of the State as a body politic, so that from that time forward the territory falls under the exclusive jurisdiction of Congress as other territory, and the State being, according to the language of the law, felo-de-se, ceases to exist.
Page 269 - ... union between North and South. A continuance of the war would soon make this plain to us, and we should see the expediency of preparing our black brethren for future citizenship by allowing them to fight for their own liberties, and educating them through heroic influences. Whatever happens next, I must say that I rejoice that the old Union is smashed. We never were one people, and never really had a country since the Constitution was formed.
Page 286 - ... and be more afraid of cowardice than of consequences. Slavery is no longer the matter in debate, and we must beware of being led off upon that sideissue. The matter now in hand is the reestablishment of order, the reaffirmation of national unity...
Page 408 - Acts and Resolves passed by the General Court of Massachusetts, in the Year 1858 ; together with the Messages, Changes of Names of Persons, &c.
Page 364 - That the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments to the Constitution of the United States having been ratified by the number of State Legislatures necessary to make their adoption valid and binding, as well as having been sanctioned by the most significant popular approval, the highest patriotism and most enlightened public policy demand of all political...

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