The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: Essay on man. Moral essays. An essay on satire (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, 1806
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Page 56 - All discord, harmony not understood ; All partial evil, universal good : And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, WHATEVER is, is RIGHT.
Page 52 - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent ; Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect in a hair as heart ; As full, as perfect in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns. To Him no high, no low, no great, no small ; He fills, He bounds, connects and equals all.
Page 64 - Know then thyself, presume not God to scan, The proper study of mankind is man. Placed on this isthmus of a middle state, A being darkly wise, and rudely great: With too much knowledge for the sceptic side, With too much weakness for the Stoic's pride, He hangs between; in doubt to act, or rest; In doubt to deem himself a God, or beast; In doubt his mind or body to prefer; Born but to die, and reas'ning but to err...
Page 147 - Parnassian laurels yield, Or reap'd in iron harvests of the field ? • Where grows ? — where grows it not? If vain our toil, We ought to blame the culture, not the soil...
Page 247 - I must paint it. Come then, the colours and the ground prepare ! Dip in the Rainbow, trick her off in Air ; Choose a firm Cloud, before it fall, and in it Catch, ere she change, the Cynthia of this minute.
Page 48 - To serve mere engines to the ruling mind ? Just as absurd for any part to claim To be another in this...
Page 105 - Who for thy table feeds the wanton fawn, For him as kindly spread the flow'ry lawn : Is it for thee the lark ascends and sings? Joy tunes his voice, joy elevates his wings.
Page 306 - Or in proud falls magnificently lost, But clear and artless, pouring through the plain Health to the sick, and solace to the swain.
Page 15 - Say first, of God above, or man below, What can we reason, but from what we know ? Of man, what see we but his station here, From which to reason, or to which refer ? Thro' worlds unnumber'd tho' the God be known, "Tis ours to trace him only in our own.
Page 65 - Created half to rise, and half to fall: Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all; Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurl'd; The glory jest, and riddle of the world!

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