Rambles in Germany and Italy, in 1840, 1842, and 1843, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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1844
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Page 204 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms never, never, never!
Page 204 - You may swell every expense and every effort still more extravagantly; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Page 286 - Two YEARS BEFORE THE MAST." DANA'S SEAMAN'S MANUAL; containing a Treatise on Practical Seamanship, with Plates ; a Dictionary of Sea Terms; Customs and Usages of the Merchant Service; Laws relating to the Practical Duties of Master and Mariners.
Page xii - Englishmen, in particular, ought to sympathise in their struggles; for the aspiration for free institutions all over the world has its source in England. Our example first taught the French nobility to seek to raise themselves from courtiers into legislators. The American war of independence, it is true, quickened this impulse, by showing the way to a successful resistance to the undue exercise of authority ; but the seed was all sown by us.
Page xii - ... now and then exceptions may occur. Thus it is better in general that a nation should have a supreme legislative power, although it may at times be abused. And then, Sir, there is this consideration, that if the abuse be enormous, Nature will rise up, and claiming her original rights, overturn a corrupt political system.
Page 140 - The far Alps were hid ; the wide lake looked drear. At length, I caught a glimpse of the scenes among which I had lived, when first I stepped out from childhood into life. There, on the shores of Bellerive, stood Diodati ; and our humble dwelling, Maison Chapuis, nestled close to the lake below. There were the terraces, the vineyards, the upward path threading them, the little port where our boat lay moored...
Page 143 - Parisian shopkeepers when speaking to their customers, but only there is the traditional phraseology still used: The courteous accent, the soft manner, erst so charming, exists no longer. I speak of a thing known and acknowledged by the French themselves. . . Their phraseology, once so delicately and even to us more straightforward people, amusingly deferential (not to superiors only, but toward one another,) is become blunt, and almost rude. The French allege several...
Page 141 - I had lived, when first I stepped out from childhood into life. There, on the shores of Bellerive, stood Diodati; and our humble dwelling, Maison Chapuis, nestled close to the lake below. There were the terraces, the vineyards, the upward path threading them, the little port where our boat lay moored; I could mark and recognise a thousand slight peculiarities, familiar objects then forgotten since now replete with recollections and associations. Was I the same person who had lived there,...
Page ix - When I reached Italy, however, and came south, I found that I could say little of Florence and Rome, as far as regarded the cities themselves, that had not been said so often and so well before, that I was satisfied to select from my letters such portions merely as touched upon subjects that I had not found mentioned elsewhere. It was otherwise as regarded the people, especially in a political point of view; and in treating of them my scope grew more serious.
Page 288 - TAYLOR'S PHILIP VAN ARTEVELDE. Price 2s. 6d. EDWIN THE FAIR, &c. Price 2s. 6d. BARRY CORNWALL'S SONGS. Price 2s. 6d. LEIGH HUNT'S POETICAL WORKS. Price 2s. 6d.

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