Kangaroo notebook: a novel

Front Cover
Knopf, Apr 23, 1996 - Fiction - 183 pages
38 Reviews
In the last novel written before his death in 1993, one of Japan's most distinguished novelists proffered a surreal vision of Japanese society that manages to be simultaneously fearful and jarringly funny. The narrator ofKangaroo Notebookwakes on morning to discover that his legs are growing radish sprouts, an ailment that repulses his doctor but provides the patient with the unusual ability to snack on himself. In short order, Kobo Abe's unraveling protagonist finds himself hurtling in a hospital bed to the very shores of hell. Abe has assembled a cast of oddities into a coherent novel, one imbued with unexpected meaning. Translated from the Japanese by Maryellen Toman Mori. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Review: Kangaroo Notebook

User Review  - Andy Tischaefer - Goodreads

I believe I heard about this book from a friend. Honestly, it just didn't work for me. It wasn't the fact that it was weird (which it was). I've read plenty of books that were weird. I think it was ... Read full review

Review: Kangaroo Notebook

User Review  - Brent Legault - Goodreads

I love Kobo Abe, but I found this book to be a bit too "zany." I put zany in quotes to highlight the fact that the zaniness, I felt, was forced. A forced zaniness is not zany at all. It's just a ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
28
Section 3
58
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Kobo Abe is the pseudonym of Kimifusa Abe, who was born in Tokyo, Japan on March 7 1924. He was brought up in Manchuria where he lived with his father, a doctor of the hosipital attached to the Imperial Medical Colledge of Manchuria. In elementary school, he was educated in the experimental way, in which a teacher trained children to debating and rapid reading. Abe went back to Tokyo and went to Sejo Koko High School, a famous private school. He was later admitted to the faculty of medicine of Tokyo University. In 1944, Abe heard that Japan would lose the war before long and he forged a medical certificate to get home to Manchuria. He earned his medical degree in 1948, but never practiced. After graduation he began his writing career and became a member of a literary group led by Kiyoteru Hamada. Often compared to Kafka , he treated the contemporary human predicament in a realistic yet symbolic style. In 1951 he got the Akutagawa Award by his first masterpiece, Kabe (The Walls). Among Abe's novels are Woman in the Dunes, published in 1962 and made into a film in 1964, and his best-known work, Secret Rendezvous. His plays include Friends, published in 1967. The first of his short stories to appear in English were collected in Beyond the Curve, 1944-66. Abe died in 1993.

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