Beer, art, and philosophy: a memoir

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Crown Point Press, 2003 - Art - 223 pages
3 Reviews
Cultural writing. Art. Philosophy. "If you are stumped by contemporary art, have wondered why contemporary artists do the things they do, make the things they make, and think the way they think, this book is for you. Tom Marioni has created a book that is easy to read, fun, and engaging. In describing his own art and thinking process, Marioni - with his dry, quiet sense of humor - demystifies contemporary art without being academic or taken: the Picassoian road, which focuses on the painterly tradition, and the Duchampian road, which encompasses a more catholic view of what can be a fit subject for art inquiry. Marioni shows why the Duchampian road offers more riches for many artists, including himself. By incorporating the social and leisure aspects of real life into his art, and by rejecting the dominant cultural work ethic, Tom Marioni amalgamates art and life to create a sophisticated and unique philosophy"--Chris Burden.

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Review: Beer, Art and Philosophy

User Review  - Ginger Markley - Goodreads

Bay area conceptual artist's memoir. Not the best writer, but his artwork is interesting, ground-breaking even (for the time). I'm not familiar with 60's Bay Area conceptual art history, so that was interesting. Worth the read (only takes a few hours). Read full review

Review: Beer, Art and Philosophy

User Review  - Rick - Goodreads

Insight into conceptual art. A spiritual journey for me! Read full review

Contents

Introduction Thomas McEvilley
9
Prologue
25
Cincinnati 1949
31
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Tom Marioni was born in 1937 in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1970 in San Francisco, he founded the first alternative art space in the United States, the Museum of Conceptual Art (MOCA). Marioni was also an innovator of Sound Art; the 1970 MOCA exhibition "Sound Sculpture. As was the first of its kind. He was the editor of the art journal "Vision from 1975-1981.

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