Aunt Annie's stories; or, The birthdays at Gordon manor, by the author of 'True stories for little people'. (Google eBook)

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1867
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Page 223 - Oh, put Thy gracious hands on me, And make me all I ought to be. Make me Thy child, a child of God, Washed in my Saviour's precious blood ; And my whole heart from sin set free, A little vessel full of Thee ;— A star of early dawn, and bright, Shining within Thy sacred light ; — A beam of grace to all around ; — A little spot of hallowed ground. Dear Jesus, take me to Thy breast, And bless me, that I may be blest ; Both when I wake, and when I sleep, Thy little lamb in safety keep.
Page 222 - Lord, look upon a little child, By nature sinful, rude, and wild; O put Thy gracious hands on me, And make me all I ought to be. " Make me Thy child— a child of God, Washed in my Saviour's precious blood; And my whole heart from sin set free, A little vessel full of Thee.
Page 158 - Ihe very mu/.zlo? of their muskets. Though the fire was destructive, and made Evans's dragoons reel for a time, the English troops maintained their ground, and the foot kept up a platooning, which checked the fury of their assailants. The struggle continued for some time without any decided advantage on either side ; but as Argyle began to perceive that he could make no impression in front upon the numerous masses of the insurgents, and that he might be out-flanked by them, he resolved to attack...
Page 64 - Fan resumed her walk, laughing a little, but with misty eyes, for it was the first time in her life that she had given a penny away, and it made her strangely happy.
Page 61 - ... the door opened and an ancient dame leaning on a staff hobbled out. Hansel and Grettel were so terrified that they let what they had in their hands fall. But the old woman shook her head and said: " Oh, ho! you dear children, who led you here? Just come in and stay with me; no ill shall befall you." She took them both by the hand and led them into the house, and laid a most sumptuous dinner before them — milk and sugared pancakes, with apples and nuts. After they had finished, two beautiful...
Page 188 - Margery watched them till they were out of sight, and then returned to the cottage to talk over what had certainly been a great event in their quiet life.

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