Is the Holocaust unique?: perspectives on comparative genocide

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Westview Press, Apr 26, 1996 - History - 222 pages
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Evaluating the Jewish Holocaust is by no means a simple matter, and one of the most controversial questions for academics is whether there have been any historical parallels for it. Have Armenians, Gypsies, American Indians, or others undergone a comparable genocide? In this fiercely controversial volume, distinguished scholars offer new discussions of this question. Presenting a wide range of strongly held views, they provide no easy consensus.Some critics contend that if the Holocaust is seen as fundamentally different in kind from other genocides or mass deaths, the suffering of other persecuted groups will be diminished. Others argue that denying the uniqueness of the Holocaust will trivialize it. Alan Rosenbaum’s introduction provides a much-needed context for readers to come to terms with this multi-dimensional dispute, to help them understand why it has recently intensified, and to enable them to appreciate what universal lessons might be gleaned from studying the Holocaust.This volume makes an important contribution to our comprehension of one of the defining events of modern history. It should be essential reading for scholars, students, and general readers interested in the Holocaust and its relationship to other instances of politically inspired mass murder.

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Contents

Introduction Alan S Rosenbaum
1
The Armenian Genocide as Precursor
87
The Comparative Aspects of the Armenian and Jewish
101
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Alan S. Rosenbaum is professor of philosophy at Cleveland State University and the author of Prosecuting Nazi War Criminals , The Philosophy of Human Rights: International Perspectives, Coercion and Autonomy: Philosophical Foundations, Issues and Practices, and Constitutionalism: The Philosophical Dimension.

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