The Lives of Those Eminent Antiquaries John Leland, Thomas Hearne, and Anthony Wood: The life of Mr. Anthony Wood (Google eBook)

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J. and J. Fletcher, 1772 - Authors, English
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Page 184 - John Locke of Christchurch was afterwards a noted writer. This John Locke was a man of a turbulent spirit, clamorous, and never contented. The club wrote and took notes from the mouth of their master, who...
Page 45 - Hall the juniors or freshmen between that time and six of the clock, and there make them sit downe on a forme in the middle of the Hall, joyning to the declaiming desk, which done, every one in order was to speake some pretty apothegme, or make a jest or bull, or speake some eloquent nonsense to make the company laugh. But if any of the freshmen came off dull or not cleverly, some of the forward or pragmatical seniors would 'tuck...
Page 69 - ... each of the assailants would take up a child and use it as a buckler of defence, when they ascended the steps, to keep themselves from being shot or brain'd.
Page 401 - God Almighty spared him so long that He had his senses entire, and full time to settle all his Concerns to his content, having writ ye most minute Particulars under His hand about his funeral.
Page 321 - ... healths on their knees to the Duke of York and Earl of Abingdon out of the buckets that hung up in the hall. They got about twenty of the trained bands of Oxford, who discharged at the drinking of every health. They had wine in great plenty from the tavern over the way, guarded by a file of musqueteers ; they had a drummer that beat round the college quadrangle and at the gate.
Page 46 - ... or salt put in college beere, with tucks to boot. Afterwards when they were to be admitted into the fraternity, the senior cook was to administer to them an oath over an old shoe, part of which runs thus " Item tu jurabis quod penniless bench non visitabis &c.
Page 44 - . *At all these fires every night, which began to be made a little after five of the clock, the senior under-graduats would bring into the hall the juniors or freshmen between that time and six of the clock, and there make them sit downe on a forme in the middle of the hall, joyning to the declaiming desk : which done, every one in order was to speake some pretty apothegme, or make a jest or bull, or speake some eloquent nonsense, to make the company laugh.
Page 75 - In another place, he says that " he set and tuned in strings in fourths, and not in fifths according to the manner : and having a good eare, and being ready to sing any tune upon hearing it once or twice, he would play them all in short time with the said way of tuning, which was never knowne before.
Page 112 - ... to goe to other company, he could no more heare him play or see him play at that time. Afterwards he came to one of the weekly meetings at Mr. Ellis's house and he played to the wonder of all the auditory : and exercising his...
Page 130 - Sunday, a terrible wind hapned in the after/ noon, while all people were at divine service. Two or three stones, and some rough/cast stuff were blown from off the tower of S. Martin alias Carfax : which falling on the leads of the church, a great alarm and out/cry was among the people in the church. Some cried