The mind of man: a text-book of psychology (Google eBook)

Front Cover
S. Sonnenschein & co., lim., 1902 - Psychology - 552 pages
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Contents

Experimental Introspection
34
Definition
37
Literature of the Subject
38
Psychological Terminology
39
A Birds Eye View
42
PART II
43
chapter ii
45
Attention is Dependent on Stimuli
47
The Area of Sensations and Images
49
The Sense Problem
50
Classification of Systems
57
Keen Normal and Lax Attention
59
Attention in the Normal Waking State is Quantitatively alike with All Men at All Times
60
Felt Strain Desire to Attend etc
61
Deliberate Attention
65
The Measure of Attention is its Effectiveness
66
Attention has no Focus
67
The Larger Waves of Attention
69
Narrowing the Normal Field of Attention
70
Expanding the Normal Field of Attention
71
The Field of Attention
72
Attention and Heredity
74
Observation and Attention
75
The Growth of Knowledge Complexes
76
Attention to One Object at a Time
77
Do we Attend in Habit?
79
Can we Attend to Habits?
80
The Routine of Life
81
Subconscious and Unconscious Thought
82
Conditions Favouring Attention
84
The Education of the Attention
87
General Conclusions
88
CHAPTER III
91
Memorising the Facts
92
The Process of Simplification
93
Reduction of Effort
97
The Result of Liberating Attention Energy
98
Does an Organised Trend ever become Automatic?
99
Organised Trends and Memory
101
The Place of Exercise
102
The Place of Judgment
103
Why is it Difficult to influence Habits?
105
Early Education
107
Each Habit is based on Others of its Kind
108
Each Habit forms a Basis for Others of its Kind
110
What is a Habit?
111
All Thought is Organised
114
65a Habit and Thought 119
119
he Psychological Method
120
CHAPTER IV
122
Richness and Poverty of Detail in a Secondary Unit or Idea 123
123
Each of the Five Senses supplies us with the Material for Secondary Units or Ideas
124
Secondary Units or Ideas which are generally Overlooked
125
WordIdeas as such
126
Why Secondary Units or Ideas tend to have Little Content
127
76a General Ideas
128
76b Speech and Thought
130
Reproduction of Motion and Detail
131
Observation is Teleologically Determined
133
Memory Contents Dwindle
134
Sense Impressions are One with Images
136
Movement and Thought
137
The Nature of Language
138
What is a Secondary Unit or an Idea?
139
Summary
140
The Dynamics of our Subject
141
Secondary Complications
143
Development Excitement and Secondary Complications
144
90a Associationism
146
Ideational Complications
151
Some Results of Economisation
152
The Language of the Adult
153
We are not restricted to One Unit or Idea at a Time
154
General Methods in Thought
155
Knowledge is mostly a Social Product
159
The Origin of Needs and their Classification
160
A Complex Ideational Process Examined
161
99b SemiConnection or Doubt and Related States
163
99c Generalisation or Topical Reaction
164
99d Abstraction
165
Economisation and Combination
166
Memory and Combination
167
Interdependence and Interaction in Combining
169
History of the Subject
170
A Birds Eye View
172
CHAPTER V
173
The Persistence of Neural Modifications
176
Neural Excitement
178
no Sudden ReCollection
179
noa The Nature of Recency
181
in Neural Excitement implies Neural Momentum
182
Memory Slowly Fades
184
Cramming
185
We forget Most Things
186
The Process of DeDevelopment
190
ReDevelopment is Attention to Surviving Traces
191
No Detailed Image in the Memory
192
Images are soon Exhausted
193
Visuals Audiles Motiles Emotiles and Mentals
195
The Matter of Memory
197
120a Motion as Imaged
203
120b Thinking in Words
204
The Growth of the Memory
205
The Elements of Memory
207
What constitutes a Perfect Memory?
208
Primary and Secondary Series Distinguished
209
Afterimages etc
210
Intuitions
213
How to ReDevelop
234
A Birds Eye View
239
CHAPTER VI
240
The Nature of the Nervous System determines how far we are Drawn to wards or Recoil from an Object
246
Definition of PleasurePain
251
Irritants
259
Organised Reaction Largely Decides what shall be regarded as Pleasurable or Painful
263
Inference as a Determining Factor in PleasurePain
264
Neural Disturbance is Absent from Normal Defensive Activity
265
Normal Thought and Action are Neutral as regards PleasurePain
266
The Relation of the Emotions to Neural Disturbances
267
Feeling Pained and Imaged Pain
271
Principles Ride RoughShod over Disturbances
273
Moods largely determine the Drift of Thought
276
Conclusions
279
A Birds Eye View
280
CHAPTER VII
282
The Effect of Volitions
286
Will as Absolute
287
Uniqueness in Willing
291
Voluntary NonVoluntary and Involuntary Activity
293
Depreciating and Appreciating the WillValue
297
Deliberation
299
Desire
301
Neural Disturbances
302
Choice from Weaker Motive
305
Action from Special Motives
307
Will
309
Will as Assertion
311
The Absolute Value of Felt Effort
313
The Sense of Effort
315
The Tripartite Division in Psychology
318
A Birds Eye View
321
CHAPTER VIII
322
Other Classes of Systems
323
Mind and Matter
324
Force
326
Appearance and Reality
327
The Self
328
176a The Nature of Mind
330
Presentations
332
Inner and Outer
333
Memory
335
Space 33
336
182a The Space of Sight and Touch
347
183 Time
348
Cause and Effect
349
Freedom
351
Mental Activity
352
Reason Understanding
353
Persistence
355
Evolution
356
Others
357
Subject and Object 359
359
Life
361
Death
363
Science
364
Physical Science and Psychology
366
Monism Dualism etc
367
A Birds Eye View
370
PART III
371
chapter IX
373
Shakespeare and the Sonnet Form
375
Peculiar Sonnets
376
Shakespeares Language
378
Shakespeares Insight
384
The Object of Shakespeares Sonnets
386
The Place of Shakespeares Sonnets
387
Shakespeare as Dramatist
388
Obstacles to Genius
393
Men of Genius 307
395
Individual Character
403
Relation to Needs
407
The Evolution of the Individual
409
The Acquisition of Language
413
A Birds Eye View
417
CHAPTER X
418
Deliberate Action Speech and Thought
421
Average Thought
422
Afferent Activity 425
425
Efferent Activity
428
Central Activity
429
Twixt Waking and Sleeping
430
Dreams
436
IntraOrganic and Efferent Stimuli in Dreams
438
The Place of Reason in the DreamState
441
Influencing the DreamState
443
The Origin of Dreams
448
The History of DreamLife
452
Provoked Dreams and Related Facts
456
Animal Psychology
462
A Birds Eye View
466
CHAPTER XI
468
Inference
479
Misleading Beliefs
481
Education
482
Fashion
483
The Esthetic Standard
485
Prose and Poetry
487
Music etc
491
The Comic
492
The Imagination
497
247 Py
499
A Birds Eye View
501
Summary
503
Index of Subjects
509
Index of Authors
522
Index of Publications
532

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Popular passages

Page 457 - How is it then, brethren ? when ye come together, every one of you hath a psalm, hath a doctrine, hath a tongue, hath a revelation, hath an interpretation. Let all things be done unto edifying.
Page 376 - Scorn not the Sonnet; Critic, you have frowned, Mindless of its just honours; with this key Shakespeare unlocked his heart; the melody Of this small lute gave ease to Petrarch's wound ; A thousand times this pipe did Tasso sound ; With it Camoens soothed an exile's grief; The Sonnet glittered a gay myrtle leaf Amid the cypress with which Dante crowned His visionary brow: a glow-worm lamp, It...
Page 376 - ... with this key Shakespeare unlocked his heart; the melody Of this small lute gave ease to Petrarch's wound; A thousand times this pipe did Tasso sound; With it Camoens soothed an exile's grief ; The sonnet glittered a gay myrtle leaf Amid the cypress with which Dante crowned His visionary brow: a glow-worm lamp, It cheered mild Spenser, called from Faery-land To struggle through dark ways; and when a damp Fell round the path of Milton, in his hand The thing became a trumpet ; whence he blew Soul-animating...
Page 13 - I frame no hypotheses: for whatever is not deduced from the phenomena is to be called an hypothesis ; and hypotheses, whether metaphysical or physical, whether of occult qualities or mechanical, have no place in experimental philosophy.
Page 382 - Come, sleep ! O sleep, the certain knot of peace, The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, Th...
Page 382 - Thou blind man's mark, thou fool's self-chosen snare, Fond Fancy's scum and dregs of scattered thought, Band of all evils, cradle of causeless care, Thou web of will whose end is never wrought; Desire! desire, I have too dearly bought With price of mangled mind thy worthless ware ; Too long, too long asleep thou hast me brought, Who should my mind to higher things prepare.
Page 62 - It is the taking possession by the mind, in clear and vivid form, of one out of what seem several simultaneously possible objects or trains of thought.
Page 375 - The golden gift that Nature did thee give, To fasten friends, and feed them at thy will, With form and favour, taught me to believe, How thou art made to show her greatest skill...
Page 384 - Lily's leaves, for envy, pale became ; And her white hands in them this envy bred. The Marigold the leaves abroad doth spread ; Because the sun's and her power is the same. The Violet of purple colour came, Dyed in the blood she made my heart to shed. In brief. All flowers from her their virtue take ; From her sweet breath, their sweet smells do proceed ; The living heat which her eyebeams doth make Warmeth the ground, and quickeneth the seed. The rain, wherewith she watereth the flowers, Falls from...
Page 129 - A great philosopher * has disputed the received opinion in this particular, and has asserted, that all general ideas are nothing but particular ones annexed to a certain term, which gives them a more extensive signification, and makes them recall upon occasion other individuals, which are similar to them. As I look upon this to be one of the greatest and most valuable discoveries that has been made of late years in the republic of letters...

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