A Complete Collection of the Lords' Protests: From the First Upon Record, in the Reign of Henry the Third, to the Present Time; with a Copious Index; to which is Added, An Historical Essay on the Legislative Power of England, Wherein the Origin of Both Houses of Parliament, Their Antient Constitution, and the Changes that Have Happened in the Persons that Composes Them, with the Occasion Thereof, are Related in Chronological Order; and Many Things Concerning the English Government, the Antiquity of the Laws of England, and the Feudal Law, are Occasionally Illustrated and Explained; in Two Volumes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Page 268 - An Act for enlarging the time of continuance of Parliaments appointed by an Act made in the sixth year of the reign of King William and Queen Mary, intituled, An Act fur the frequent meeting and calling of Parliaments...
Page 255 - Britain, when the lords declared by a majority of five, that no patent of honour granted to any peer of Great Britain, who was a peer of Scotland at the time of the Union, entitled such peer to sit and vote in parliament, or to sit upon the trial of peers.
Page 261 - But if the diflenters mould not be provoked by this feverity to concur in the deftruction of their country, and the proteftant religion, yet we may juftly fear they may be driven, by this bill, from England, to the great prejudice of our manufactures : for as we gained them by the perfecutions abroad, fo we may lofe them by the like proceedings at home.
Page 228 - An Act for exempting their Majesties' Protestant subjects, dissenting from the Church of England, from the penalties of certain laws.
Page 319 - An Act for granting the People called Quakers, such Forms of Affirmation or Declaration, as may remove the Difficulties which many of them lie under...
Page 63 - ... that after judgment given in the courts of our Lord the King, the parties and their heirs shall be thereof in peace until the judgment be undone by attaint or by error, if there be errors, as hath been used by the laws in the times of the King's progenitors.
Page 233 - To the fifteenth refolution : Becaufe, we humbly conceive, nothing could have been more equal on this head of the treaty, than that neither of the kingdoms fhould have been burthened with the debts of the other, contracted before the union ; and if that propofal, which we find once made in the minutes of the treaty, had taken...
Page 389 - ... it; he then faid he had a verbal order, but refufed to fay from whom ; the petitioner told him, if it were verbal only, it did not appear to him, and he would not be fearched...
Page 247 - ... are ; for the people's only guide is the law, and they can never be guided by what they can never be informed of: and we do humbly conceive, that this...
Page 390 - Petitioner thought they could have no Pretence to feize while he was under the Protection of Parliament, he took it again from them and tore it, but they carried a Part of it along with them; they fearched alfo his two Servants below, and took away a Seal from one of them ; and...

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