Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural History, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Boston Society of Natural History., 1844 - Natural history
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Page 114 - That the thanks of the Society be presented to Dr. Jeffries Wyman, for his interesting and instructive address, and that a copy be requested for publication.
Page 114 - The Society then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year, and the following gentlemen were unanimously chosen : President, - - Hon.
Page 18 - A Committee to nominate Officers for the Society for the ensuing year was chosen, viz : Dr.
Page 99 - Ríales, 1609), from below Arequipa, as far as Tarapaca, which is more than two hundred leagues of coast, they use no other manure than that of marine birds, which exist, both great and small, on all the coasts of Peru, and go in flocks perfectly incredible, if not seen. They are reared on some uninhabited islands which exist on that coast, and the manure which they leave is of inconceivable amount.
Page 103 - ... with five prominent, white teeth, namely, one upon the transverse margin, two upon the umbilical margin, and two upon the labial margin ; peristome thickened, not reflected; umbilicus a little open.
Page 49 - ... anastomosing with each other, and having a general longitudinal direction. Mantle covering the whole body. Foot expanded at its margin, and visible beyond the sides of the mantle ; no locomotive disk.
Page 29 - Krebs was accepted, and it was voted that the thanks of the Society be presented to him for his elegant and generous gift.
Page 99 - History, on the origin of the valuable manure called guano, from the sea islands off the coast of Peru. We extract the following passage from it: — With reference to the opinion entertained by some, that the guano had been accumulating from a period perhaps prior to the origin of the human race, Mr T. translated the following passage from the " Memoriales Riales" of
Page 99 - Peru, both great and small, and go in flocks perfectly incredible, if not seen. They are reared on some uninhabited islands which exist on that coast, and the manure that they leave is of inconceivable amount. At a distance the hills of" it resemble the mounds on some snowy plain. In the time of the Incas there was so much vigilance in guarding these birds, that, during the rearing season, no person was allowed to visit the islands under the pain of death, in order that they might not be frightened...
Page 99 - ... pain of death, in order that they might not be frightened and driven from their nests. Neither was it allowed to kill them at any time, either on or off the islands, under the same penalty.

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