The Chronicle of Henry of Huntingdon: Comprising The History of England, from the Invasion of Juluis Csar to the Accession of Henry II. Also, The Acts of Stephen, King of England and Duke of Normandy (Google eBook)

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Henry G. Bohn, 1853 - Civilization, Medieval - 442 pages
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Page 75 - When the ear heard me, then it blessed me; And when the eye saw me, it gave witness to me: Because I delivered the poor that cried, And the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. 189 The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me: And I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
Page 87 - I say, flying in at one door, and immediately out at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry storm ; but after a short space of fair weather, he immediately vanishes out of your sight, into the dark winter from which he had emerged. So this life of man appears for a short space, but of what went before, or what is to follow, we are utterly ignorant. If, therefore, this new doctrine contains something more certain, it seems justly to deserve to be followed.
Page 70 - God ; that the nation, seeing that their temples are not destroyed, may remove error from their hearts, and knowing and adoring the true God, may the more familiarly resort to the places to which they have been accustomed.
Page 64 - Gregory, the servant of the servants of God, to the servants of our Lord. Forasmuch as it had been better not to begin a good work, than to think of desisting from that which has been begun, it behoves you, my beloved sons, to fulfil the good work, which, by the help of our Lord, you have undertaken.
Page 321 - They are, under the point of view of religion and philosophy, wholly rotten, and from the sole of the foot to the crown of the head there is no soundness in them.
Page 79 - To whom the man of God, Augustine, is said, in a threatening manner, to have foretold, that in case they would not join in unity with their brethren, they should be warred upon by their enemies ; and, if they would not preach the way of life to the English nation, they should at their hands undergo the vengeance of death.
Page 65 - Lord, you have undertaken. Let not, therefore, the toil of the journey nor the tongues of evil-speaking men deter you...
Page 67 - Canterbury, which was the metropolis of all his dominions, and, pursuant to his promise, besides allowing them sustenance, did not refuse them liberty to preach. It is reported that as they drew near to the city, after their manner, with the holy cross and the image of our sovereign Lord and King, Jesus Christ, they in concert...
Page 81 - Britain, without possessing any previous knowledge of its inhabitants. We held both the Britons and Scots in great esteem for sanctity, believing that they had proceeded according to the custom of the universal church. But...
Page 64 - Augustine, who had been appointed to be consecrated bishop in case they were received by the English, that he might, by humble entreaty, obtain of the Holy Gregory, that they should not be compelled to undertake so dangerous, toilsome, and uncertain a journey. The pope, in reply, sent them a hortatory epistle, persuading them to proceed in the work of the Divine word, and rely on the assistance of the Almighty.

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