Soviet Criminal Justice Under Stalin

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 28, 1996 - History - 494 pages
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Soviet Criminal Justice Under Stalin is the first comprehensive account of Stalin's struggle to make criminal law in the USSR a reliable instrument of rule, emphasizing the initial weakness of the Soviet state and the limits of Stalin's capacity to rule. Peter Solomon also offers new perspectives on collectivization, the Great Terror, the politics of abortion, and the disciplining of the labor force. This book should appeal to anyone interested in the political, social, or legal history of the USSR, judicial reform in post-Soviet states, law in authoritarian regimes, or comparative legal development.
  

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Contents

The design of an experiment
17
Criminal justice under NEP
49
Campaign justice
81
The decline of legality
111
Returning to traditional legal order
153
Stalins criminal policy from tradition to excess
196
The Great Terror and criminal justice
230
The reconstruction of criminal justice
267
Preparing for war the criminalization of labor infractions and related campaigns
299
Molding legal officials for careers the effects of education for service
337
The dynamics of Stalinist justice bureaucratic and political pressures on legal officials
366
The Distortion and limits of criminal policy
404
Conclusion and Implications
447
Bibliography
471
Index
483
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