From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawaiʻi (Google eBook)

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, Jan 1, 1999 - History - 255 pages
19 Reviews
Since its publication in 1993 From a Native Daughter, a provocative, well-reasoned attack against the rampant abuse of Native Hawaiian rights, institutional racism, and gender discrimination, has generated heated debates in Hawai'i and throughout the world. This revised work includes new material that builds on issues and concerns raised in the first edition: Native Hawaiian student organizing at the University of Hawai'i; the master plan of the Native Hawaiian self-governing organization Ka Lahui Hawai'i and its platform on the four political arenas of sovereignty; the 1989 Hawai'i declaration of the Hawai'i ecumenical coalition on tourism; a typology on racism and imperialism. Brief introductions to each of the previously published essays brings them up to date and situates them in the current Native Hawaiian rights discussion.
  

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Review: From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawai'i

User Review  - thinker bell - Goodreads

Raw reading. Haulani-Kay Trask is an engaging writer and activist. The rawness of the book calls out all the forms of US Imperialism's bloodshed nature upon the Hawaiian people. I highly recommend ... Read full review

Review: From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawai'i

User Review  - Beth - Goodreads

Well. That was eye-opening, even for a Native like me. Prior to picking up this book, I had a general awareness of my ignorance of Hawaiian history, but that pertained to the time before the ... Read full review

Contents

V
25
VI
41
VII
58
IX
63
XI
65
XII
82
XIII
96
XIV
106
XX
144
XXI
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XXII
164
XXIII
180
XXIV
190
XXV
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XXVI
206
XXVII
232

XVII
108
XVIII
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XIX
131
XXIX
240
XXXI
246
Copyright

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Page 28 - The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government ; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.
Page 13 - Government. Now, to avoid any collision of armed forces, and perhaps the loss of life, I do, under this protest, and impelled by said force, yield my authority until such time as the Government of the United States...
Page 15 - By an act of war, committed with the participation of a diplomatic representative of the United States and without authority of Congress, the Government of a feeble but friendly and confiding people has been overthrown.
Page 28 - International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights...
Page 35 - Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinctive spiritual and material relationship with the lands, territories, waters and coastal seas and other resources which they have traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used, and to uphold their responsibilities to future generations in this regard.

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About the author (1999)

Haunani-Kay Trask is professor of Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawai'i.

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