Handbook for Readers and Students: Intended as a Help to Individuals, Associations, School Districts and Seminaries of Learning, in the Selection of Works for Reading, Investigation, Or Professional Study (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper & brothers, 1843 - Best books - 330 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege Through all the years of this our life, to lead From, joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith that all which we behold Is...
Page 285 - The first creature of God, in the works of the days, was the light of the sense ; the last was the light of reason ; and his sabbath work ever since is the illumination of his Spirit.
Page 16 - Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking makes what we read ours. We are of the ruminating kind, and it is not enough to cram ourselves with a great load of collections; unless we chew them over again, they will not give us strength and nourishment.
Page 29 - The Civil and Literary Chronology of Greece, from the earliest Accounts to the death of Augustus.
Page 42 - Bowling is good for the stone and reins ; shooting for the lungs and breast; gentle walking for the stomach ; riding for the head ; and the like. So if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics ; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again.
Page 39 - Government, that learning should rather hurt, than enable thereunto, is a thing very improbable: we see it is accounted an error to commit a natural body to empiric physicians, which commonly have a few pleasing receipts whereupon they are confident and adventurous...
Page 17 - Nothing, in truth, has such a tendency to weaken, not only the powers of invention, but the intellectual powers in general, as a habit of extensive and various reading, without reflection.
Page 283 - Dr. Ure's Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, and Mines : Containing a clear Exposition of their Principles and Practice.
Page 205 - The History of Modern Europe : with a View of the Progress of Society, from the Rise of the Modern Kingdoms to the Peace of Paris, in 1763.
Page 75 - Vanity of Human Wishes,' — all the examples and mode of giving them sublime, as well as the latter part, with the exception of an occasional couplet. I do not so much admire the opening. I remember...

Bibliographic information