Economic Collapse, Economic Change: Getting to the Roots of the Crisis (Google eBook)

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M.E. Sharpe, 2011 - Business & Economics - 237 pages
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This thoughtful book offers a widely accessible account of the recent economic collapse and crisis, emphasizing the deep nexus of economic inequality, undemocratic power, and leave-it-to-the-market ideology at its root.

The authors develop this theory in detail, including clear analysis of the data. terms, and policies that dominate discussion of the crash. Based on their understanding of the origins of the crisis, they propose a program for reform that is equally dependent on popular action and changes in government policy.

The book's engaging prose makes it appealing both to students and to general readers seeking an understanding of the crisis that moves beyond recent headlines to address the underlying systems and conditions that continue to make the American economy vulnerable.

  

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Contents

Understanding Causes to Find Cures
3
2 Where Are We Now? Why Is This a Crisis?
19
The Changing Terrain of Inequality Power and Ideology
33
3 Ideology and Power in the PostWorld War II Era
37
Change in the Last Quarter of the Twentieth Century
53
PART III The Emergence of Crisis in the United States
65
Loosening the Reins on Finance
69
6 Tracking the Evolution of the Crisis
86
8 China the United States and the Crisis
143
PART V Moving in a Different Direction
161
An Appraisal
163
10 Moving in a Different Direction
188
Appendix A Brief Notes on Wealth and Power
213
Appendix B Whats Wrong with the Case for FreeMarket Globalization?
221
Index
227
About the Authors
237

PART IV Globalization and Instability
119
7 Shaping the Global Economy
121

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About the author (2011)

Arthur MacEwan is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Economics and Senior Felloa in the Center for Social Policy at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Educated at the University of CHicago and Harvard University, he has written extensively on international economic issues, economic development, and U.S. economic affairs. Professor MacEwan writes regularly for Dollars & Sense magazine.

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