India (Google eBook)

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Page 1746 - The stainless ramps of huge Himala's wall, Ranged in white ranks against the blue untrod Infinite, wonderful whose uplands vast, And lifted universe of crest and crag, Shoulder and shelf, green slope and icy horn, Riven ravine, and splintered precipice Led climbing thought higher and higher, until It seemed to stand in heaven and speak with gods.
Page 1729 - Black mustard-seed, a tola; only mark Thou take it not from any hand or house Where father, mother, child, or slave hath died: It shall be well if thou canst find such seed.
Page 1730 - My sister! thou hast found,' the Master said, ' Searching for what none finds that bitter balm I had to give thee. He thou lovedst slept Dead on thy bosom yesterday: to-day Thou know'st the whole wide world weeps with thy woe : The grief which all hearts share grows less for one. Lo! I would pour my blood if it could stay...
Page 1730 - Nor smile beneath the wild vines by the stream, To seek thy face and kiss thy feet, and pray Where I might find this seed and find no death, If now, indeed, my baby be not dead, As I do fear, and as they said to me.
Page 1758 - India,' sanctioned August 2, 1858. By the terms of this Act, all the territories heretofore under the government of the East India Company are vested in Her Majesty, and all its powers are exercised in her name ; all territorial and other revenues and all tributes and other payments are likewise received in her name, and disposed of for the purposes of the government of India alone, subject to the provisions of this Act.
Page 1730 - the Master said, " Searching for what none finds, that bitter balm I had to give thee. He thou lovedst slept Dead on thy bosom yesterday; to-day Thou know'st the whole wide world weeps with thy woe; The grief which all hearts share grows less for one. Lo! I would pour my blood if it could stay Thy tears, and win the secret of that curse Which makes sweet love our anguish, and which drives O'er flowers and pastures to the sacrifice As these dumb beasts are driven men their lords. I seek that...
Page 1729 - But I who could not lose my precious boy, Prayed of the physic, which might bring the light Back to his eyes; it was so very small That kiss-mark of the serpent, and I think It could not hate him, gracious as he was, Nor hurt him in his sport. And some one said, " There is a holy man upon the hill . Lo! now he passeth in the yellow robe Ask of the Rishi if there be a cure For that which ails thy son.
Page 1727 - Christians and Mahometans, and not being skilled in controversy, declare, that they are utterly unable to judge which religion is best; but to be certain of not entirely rejecting the truth, they very prudently follow both. They go to the...
Page 1729 - Whom, when they came unto the river-side, A woman dove-eyed, young, with tearful face And lifted hands saluted, bending low : " Lord ! thou art he," she said, "who yesterday Had pity on me in the fig-grove here, Where I live lone and reared my child ; but he Straying amid the blossoms found a snake, Which twined about his wrist, whilst he did laugh And tease the quick forked tongue and opened mouth Of that cold playmate.
Page 1799 - The mingled spoil were scatter'd here. The Lake, too, like a garden breathes With the rich buds- that o'er it lie, As if a shower of fairy wreaths Had fallen upon it from the sky...