The novels of Jane Austen, Volume 7 (Google eBook)

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J. Grant, 1905
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Review: The Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen: 6-Volume Set

User Review  - A - Goodreads

I have been a fan of Jane Austen for years. It a great day when my daughters decided to read her books. She was a person with amazing insight on human nature. Read full review

Review: The Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen: Volume VI: Minor Works

User Review  - Judine - Goodreads

I enjoyed looking at the process of writing that is illustrated by the works written by the young Jane Austen. Her wit and sarcasm were firmly grounded from the very beginning, and there were a few ... Read full review

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Page 2 - The real evils, indeed, of Emma's situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself: these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments.
Page 1 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 48 - You are so much used to live alone, that you do not know the value of a companion; and perhaps no man can be a good judge of the comfort a woman feels in the society of one of her own sex, after being used to it all her life. I can imagine your objection to Harriet Smith. She is not the superior young woman which Emma's friend ought to be. But on the other hand, as Emma wants to see her better informed, it will be an inducement to her to read more herself. They will read together. She means it, I...
Page 336 - Much could not be hoped from the traffic of even the busiest part of Highbury; - Mr Perry walking hastily by, Mr William Cox letting himself in at the office door, Mr Cole's carriage horses returning from exercise, or a stray letter-boy on an obstinate mule, were the liveliest objects she could presume to expect; and when her eyes fell only on the butcher with his tray, a tidy old woman travelling homewards from shop with her full basket, two curs quarrelling over a dirty bone, and a string of dawdling...
Page 143 - This had just taken place, and with great cordiality, when John Knightley made his appearance; and "How d'ye do, George?" and "John, how are you?" succeeded in the true English style, burying under a calmness that seemed all but indifference the real attachment which would have led either of them, if requisite, to do everything for the good of the other.
Page 123 - If I know myself, Harriet, mine is an active, busy mind, with a great many independent resources ; and I do not perceive why I should be more in want of employment at forty or fifty than one-and-twenty.
Page 297 - This was the occurrence :—The Coles had been settled some years in Highbury, and were very good sort of people —friendly, liberal, and unpretending ; but, on the other hand, they were of low origin, in trade, and only moderately genteel. On their first coming into the country, they had lived in proportion to their income, quietly, keeping little company, and that little unexpensively; but the last year or two had brought them a considerable increase of means—the house in town had yielded greater...
Page 26 - Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a School — not of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality upon new principles and new systems — and where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanity...
Page 211 - There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do, if he chuses, and that is, his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution. It is Frank Churchill's duty to pay this attention to his father.
Page 31 - Woodhouse's feelings were in sad warfare. He loved to have the cloth laid, because it had been the fashion of his youth, but his conviction of suppers being very unwholesome made him rather sorry to see anything put on it; and while his hospitality would have welcomed his visitors to everything, his care for their health made him grieve that they would eat. Such another small basin of thin gruel as his own was all that he could, with thorough selfapprobation, recommend; though he might constrain...

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