Critical Essays on Dramatic Poetry (Google eBook)

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Robert Urie, 1761 - Drama - 195 pages
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Page 11 - Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him : but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition.
Page 12 - Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony : who, though he had no hand in his death, shall receive the benefit of his dying, a place in the commonwealth ; as which of you shall not ? With this I depart, — that, as I slew my best lover for the good of Rome, I have the same dagger for myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.
Page 12 - Capitol; his glory not extenuated, wherein he was worthy, nor his offences enforced, for which he suffered death. Enter ANTONY and others, with CESAR'S Body. Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony : who, though he had no hand in his death, shall receive the benefit of his dying, a place in the commonwealth ; as which of you shall not...
Page 8 - How beautiful is death, when earn'd by virtue ! Who would not be that youth ? what pity is it That we can die but once to serve our country...
Page 8 - CATO; Alas ! my friends ! Why mourn you thus ? let not a private loss Afflict your hearts. 'Tis Rome requires our tears. The mistress of the world, the seat of empire, The nurse of heroes, the delight of gods, That humbled the proud tyrants of the earth, And set the nations free, Rome is no more. O liberty! O virtue ! O my country!
Page 10 - I am inclined to think, this opinion proceeded originally from the zeal of the partizans of our author and Ben Jonson ; as they endeavoured to exalt the one at the expence of the other. It is ever the nature of parties to be in extremes ; and nothing is so probable, as that because Ben...
Page 73 - Come to me, come, my soldier, to my arms! You've been too long away from my embraces; But, when I have you fast, and all my own, With broken murmurs, and with amorous sighs, I'll say, you were unkind, and punish you, And mark you red with many an eager kiss.
Page 73 - As all your bus'ness were to count my passion. One day past by and nothing saw but love ; Another came, and still 'twas only love: The suns were weary'd out with looking on, And I untir'd with loving.
Page 83 - On the calm, peaceful, flourishing head of it; Whence we may view, deep, wondrous deep below, How poor mistaken mortals wandering go...
Page 11 - ... fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him : but, as he was ambitious, I flew him: There are tears, for his love; joy, for his fortune; honour, for his valour; and death, for his ambition.

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