Notes on the State of Virginia: With an Appendix Relative to the Murder of Logan's Family (Google eBook)

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Wilson & Blackwell, 1803 - Slavery - 356 pages
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Review: Notes on the State of Virginia

User Review  - Thomas A Wiebe - Goodreads

Jefferson's only book, an answer to French inquiries regarding Virginia while our allies during the Revolutionary War. Reluctantly published by Jefferson first in France. While showing the amazing ... Read full review

Review: Notes on the State of Virginia

User Review  - Tom Wiebe - Goodreads

Jefferson's only book, an answer to French inquiries regarding Virginia while our allies during the Revolutionary War. Reluctantly published by Jefferson first in France. While showing the amazing ... Read full review

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Page 221 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Page 309 - Almighty power to do; that the impious presumption of legislators and rulers, civil as well as ecclesiastical, who, being themselves but fallible and uninspired men have assumed dominion over the faith of others, setting up their own opinions and modes of thinking as the only true and infallible, and as such endeavoring to impose them on others, hath established and maintained false religions over the greatest part of the world, and through all time ; that to compel a man to furnish contributions...
Page 221 - The parent storms, the child looks on, catches the lineaments of wrath, puts on the same airs in the circle of smaller slaves, gives a loose to the worst of passions, and thus nursed, educated, and daily exercised in tyranny, cannot but be stamped by it with odious peculiarities.
Page 225 - The mobs of great cities add just so much to the support of pure government, as sores do to the strength of the human body.
Page 311 - ... or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
Page 216 - The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods, or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.
Page 222 - And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God?
Page 32 - If the view from the top be painful and intolerable, that from below is delightful in an equal extreme. It is impossible for the emotions arising from the sublime to be felt beyond what they are here ; so beautiful an arch, so elevated, so light, and springing as it were up to heaven ! the rapture of the spectator is really indescribable...
Page 161 - For this reason that convention which passed the ordinance of government, laid its foundation on this basis, that the legislative, executive, and judiciary departments should be separate and distinct, so that no person should exercise the powers of more than one of them at the same time.
Page 147 - The Treasurer and company of Adventurers and Planters of the City of London for the first colony in Virginia...

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