An Introduction to Philosophy

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 2005 - Philosophy - 202 pages
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Jacques Maritain's An Introduction to Philosophy was first published in 1931. Since then, this book has stood the test of time as a clear guide to what philosophy is and how to philosophize. Inspired by the Thomistic Revival called for by Leo XIII, Maritain relies heavily on Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas to shape a philosophy that, far from sectarian theology in disguise, is driven by reason and engages the modern world. Re-released as part of the Sheed & Ward Classic series, An Introduction to Philosophy is sure to enliven the minds of students and general readers for years to come. From the new introduction by Ralph McInerny: You are about to read a magnificent introduction not only to a kind of philosophy but to philosophizing itself. Jacques Maritain was a relatively young man when he wrote this book, but his effort is one that attracts any philosopher more and more as he grows older. However odd and unusual what he says becomes, the philosopher yearns to show how even the most abstruse claims can be put into relation with what the reader already knows. That, in its essence, is what teaching is.In this book, the reader will find a wise and certain guide into philosophizing as such. And, in the end, he will find that what he reads is really only a refinement and development of what he and everybody else already knew.
  

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Very good overview of philosophy. If I can only retain what I've read. Read full review

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Contents

Philosophic Thought before Philosophy in the Strict Sense
3
Primitive tradition
4
b The Indians
6
ii Buddhism
11
iii Other schools
13
c The Chinese
14
limitations of human wisdom
18
The Greeks the chosen people of reason
19
Conclusion VII
111
b Realism
112
The Philosophy of Mathematics and the Philosophy of Nature
114
The philosophy of nature
115
a Mechanism
116
c Hylomorphism
117
Psychology
119
Conclusion VIII
121

The PreSocratic Philosophers
21
b The great physicists
24
ii Democritus
26
iii Anaxagoras
27
Pythagoras
28
Parmenides
32
The Sophists and Socrates
34
The Sophists
35
Socrates
37
a Ethics and knowledge
38
b Irony maieutic dialectic
39
c Moderate intellectualism
40
Plato and Aristotle
42
Plato
43
b His system of philosophy
45
c Its limitations
47
Aristotle
48
a Corrections of Plato
49
b The Aristotelian system
52
c Aristotles works
56
Aristotle and St Thomas
60
Philosophia Perennis
62
Definition of Philosophy
64
Its material object
67
Its formal object
69
Philosophy and the Special Sciences
71
It governs them
72
It defends them
76
It is preeminently free
77
Conclusion II
81
Philosophy and Theology
82
Theology judges philosophy
83
Philosophy submits to theology its conclusions not its premises
84
Philosophia ancilla theologies
86
Conclusion III
88
Philosophy and Common Sense
89
Philosophy is derived from common sense understood as the natural apprehension of first principles
90
Common sense may accidentally judge philosophy
91
Conclusion IV
95
THE CLASSIFICATION OF PHILOSOPHY
99
The Main Divisions of Philosophy
101
Their objects
104
Conclusion V
106
Logic
107
Ideas and images
108
Conclusion VI
109
Conflicting schools
123
Criticism Epistemology
126
Problems of truth
127
Conclusion IX
129
b Rationalism
130
Problems of the object of the intellect
131
Conclusion X
133
Conclusion XI
134
Essence
135
Essence
136
a In the wide sense
137
b In the strict sense
139
Characteristic of the essence
141
Conclusion XII
144
Our intellect is capable of knowing the essences of things
146
Essence is universal in the mind
148
Conclusion XIV
149
b First matter
151
c Archetypical being
152
d Nature essence and quiddity
154
Ontology Substance and Accident
157
Substance
161
Conclusion XV
163
Accident
165
Conclusion XVI
166
Conflicting schools
167
The Individuality of Substance
170
b Per se a se in se
173
Ontology Act and Potentiality
176
b Their apparent incompatibility
177
c Solved by the concept potentiality
178
Potency or Potentiality
179
Act
180
Conclusion XVII
181
Axioms ivii
183
Conflicting schools
185
b Virtual and formal actual
188
d In express act in accomplished act
189
Theodicy Natural Theology
190
Subsistent being itself
191
The Philosophy of Art Ethics
193
Ethics
196
Division of ethics
199
Conclusion
201
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\Jacques Maritain was one of the most prolific Catholic philosophers of the 20th century.

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