Walden (Google eBook)

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George Routledge & sons, 1904 - 256 pages
1321 Reviews
  

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5 stars
502
4 stars
294
3 stars
276
2 stars
150
1 star
99

Love his writing style. - Goodreads
Older English, hard to read. - Goodreads
The beginning was great, gripping even, with his prose. - Goodreads
Boring, both as a thing to do and as a book plot. - Goodreads
Great advice on simple living. - Goodreads
The book is full of insight, it is easy to understand. - Goodreads

Review: Walden

User Review  - Kristina - Goodreads

The diary of the world's first hipster. Meh. Read full review

Review: Walden

User Review  - Melanie Walker - Goodreads

Beautifully written! Reading Walden is a wonderful meditation on the woods Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
27
III
81
IV
94
V
102
VI
115
VII
123
VIII
134
XI
167
XII
173
XIII
182
XIV
192
XV
204
XVI
214
XVII
222
XVIII
233

IX
143
X
148
XIX
247

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Popular passages

Page 87 - I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practise resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life...
Page 251 - If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
Page 29 - But men labor under a mistake. The better part of the man is soon ploughed into the soil for compost. By a seeming fate, commonly called necessity, they are employed, as it says in an old book, laying up treasures which moth and rust will corrupt and thieves break through and steal. It is a fool's life, as they will find when they get to the end of it, if not before.
Page 249 - I left the woods for as good a reason as I went there. Perhaps it seemed to me that I had several more lives to live, and could not spare any more time for that one. It is remarkable how easily and insensibly we fall into a particular route, and make a beaten track for ourselves. I had not lived there a week before my feet wore a path from my door to the pond-side; and though it is five or six years since I trod it, it is still quite distinct.
Page 88 - Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity! I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumb nail.
Page 249 - I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a...
Page 74 - In short, I am convinced, both by faith and experience, that to maintain one's self on this earth is not a hardship but a pastime, if we will live simply and wisely; as the pursuits of the simpler nations are still the sports of the more artificial. It is not necessary that a man should earn his living by the sweat of his brow, unless he sweats easier than I do.
Page 27 - In most books, the /, or first person, is omitted; in this it will be retained; that, in respect to egotism, is the main difference. We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking. I should not talk so much about myself if there were any body else whom I knew as well.
Page 82 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Page 250 - I desire to speak somewhere without bounds; like a man in a waking moment, to men in their waking moments; for I am convinced that I cannot exaggerate enough even to lay the foundation of a true expression.

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