Arctic Explorations and Discoveries During the Nineteenth Century: Being Detailed Accounts of the Several Expeditions to the North Seas, Both English and American, Conducted by Ross, Parry, Back, Franklin, M'Clure, and Others, Including the First Grinnell Expedition, Under Lieutenant De Haven, and the Final Effort in Search of Sir John Franklin (Google eBook)

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Samuel Mosheim Smucker
Miller, Orton, 1857 - Arctic regions - 517 pages
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Page 316 - Venerable, off the coast of Holland, the i2th of October, by log (nth1 three PM Camperdown ESE eight mile. Wind N. by E. Sir, I have the pleasure to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that...
Page 208 - I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that her Majesty's ships Erebus and Terror...
Page 154 - Medal of the Bath and West of England Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce, was unanimously voted to him.
Page 73 - It would be impossible to describe our sensations after entering this miserable abode and discovering how we had been neglected; the whole party shed tears, not so much for our own fate as for that of our friends in the rear, whose lives depended entirely on our sending immediate relief from this place.
Page 278 - The crew laughed out in glee. Sir John, Sir John, 'tis bitter cold, The scud drives on the breeze, The ice comes looming from the north, The very sunbeams freeze.
Page 278 - The little Indian said; And change your cloth for fur clothing, Your vessel for a sled. But lightly laughed the stout Sir John, And the crew laughed with him too : A sailor to change from ship to sled, I ween were something new...
Page 73 - Previous to setting out the whole party ate the remains of their old shoes and whatever scraps of leather they had to strengthen their stomachs for the fatigue of the day's journey.
Page 130 - Never perhaps was witnessed a finer scene than on the deck of my little ship, when all hope of life had left us. Noble as the character of the British sailor is always allowed to be, in cases of danger, yet I did not believe it to be possible, that among forty-one persons, not one repining word should have been uttered.
Page 89 - An Act for more effectually discovering the longitude at sea, and encouraging attempts to find a northern passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and to approach the North Pole.
Page 82 - Had my own life alone been threatened, I would not have purchased it by such a measure ; but I considered myself as intrusted also with the protection of Hepburn's, a man, who, by his humane attentions and devotedness, had so endeared himself to me, that I felt more anxiety for his safety than for my own.

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