History and genealogy of the Thomas J. and Henrietta (Howells) Powell families (Google eBook)

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1918 - 202 pages
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Page 16 - ... First, a pig would dart back and run like a deer till he was headed and turned, by which time the others would meet him and all have to be driven up ; while in the meantime a cow or two would be sailing down a by-lane with elevated head and tail, and a breathless boy circling through a field or the woods to intercept her career ; and then the sheep would start over a broken piece of fence, the last following the first and leaping higher over every obstacle till they were brought back to the road....
Page 16 - To start off such a mixed drove of animals was no trifling affair, for, though they would drive pretty well after getting used to the road and a day or two's experience, their obstinacy and contrariety at first was without parallel, and a boy to each animal was little enough. First, a pig would dart back and run like a deer till he was headed and turned, by which time the others would meet him and all have to be driven up ; while in the meantime a cow or two would be sailing down a by-lane with elevated...
Page 78 - Stronger every wilding grows. ••Let those toil for gold who please, Or, for fame renounce their ease. What is fame ? An empty bubble ; Gold ? a shining, constant trouble.
Page 198 - ... of American life and society and character he has painted, and with which I have had sufficient familiarity to know the truth and delicacy of his touch. Neither the rhythm, nor the emphasis, nor the shading of his meaning has robbed his style of the lucidity and clearness that delight a common mind like mine, and his delightful and kindly humor that leaves a flower in one's memory has created a feeling of affection for the author that prompts an expression like this. Easily at the head of the...
Page 163 - Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age, Like a shock of corn cometh in in its season. Lo this, we have searched it, so it is ; Hear it, and know thou it for thy good.
Page 16 - ... at first was without parallel, and a boy to each animal was little enough. First, a pig would dart back and run like a deer till he was headed and turned, by which time the others would meet him and all have to be driven up ; while in the meantime a cow or two would be sailing down a by-lane with elevated head and tail, and a breathless boy circling through a field or the woods to intercept her career ; and then the sheep would start over a broken piece of fence, the last following the first...
Page 199 - Howells' pen is beautifully wrought out, with no suggestion of hurry or the oil of the machine. Mr. Howells, in his long and useful life, has been content to live in literature. He has attempted to play a part in no other sphere. By taste, by ability, by imagination, by the genius of taking pains, he finds himself now five years beyond the age of the psalmist, representing the best and highest of American literature. Everything that he has written sustains the highest standard of social purity, and...
Page 13 - ... transport the family and most of the goods, by making repeated trips. On the last trip out, as it was late at night, the man who drove the wagon stayed till morning. After unhitching, he left the coach standing in the lane, where it terminated on the brow of a very steep hill. It had not stood there long till an enterprising old sow, making a survey of the machine, got her nose under a wheel, when it started down the hill. We heard the rumbling, and just got out in time to see it going over a...
Page 199 - ... beautifully wrought out, with no suggestion of hurry or the oil of the machine. Mr. Howells, in his long and useful life, has been content to live in literature. He has attempted to play a part in no other sphere. By taste, by ability, by imagination, by the genius of taking pains, he finds himself now five years beyond the age of the psalmist, representing the best and highest of American literature. Everything that he has written sustains the highest standard of social purity, and aspiration,...
Page 13 - Just before we moved out, my Uncle Powell and his family, who had stopped on their way from England near Richmond, Va.. long enough to spend all the money they had, came to Steubenville, and as he had engaged a farm that he could not enter upon till spring, he took the house we lived in. He, however, had a team of horses and an old stage coach in which the family had traveled from Virginia, that still bore the lettering, 'Richmond and Staunton Mail Stage,' which was a rather stunning thing in itself,...

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