Legends of Old Honolulu (Google eBook)

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Press of Geo. H. Ellis Company, 1915 - Legends - 282 pages
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Page 1 - a pleasant slope of restful land." "Honolulu" was probably a name given to a very rich district of farm land near what is now known as the junction of Liliha and School Streets, because its chief was Honolulu, one of the high chiefs of the time of Kakuhihewa, according to the legends. Kamakau, the Hawaiian historian, describes this...
Page 208 - My love, the first surf. I ride on these white waves." As she rested on the crest of a surf wave sweeping toward the beach, she saw a squid rising up and tossing out its long arms to catch her. She laughed and caught it in her hand, saying, "One squid, the first, for the gods." This she took to the beach and put in a fish basket she had left on the sand with her skirt and lei. Again she went out, and saw two squid rising to meet her. This time she sang, " Here are two squid for the grandparents,"...
Page 175 - Kawelo went down to the river. All day long he paddled up and down the river, and all day long his strength grew with each paddle stroke. Thus day by day he paddled from morning until night, and no one in all the island had such renown for handling a canoe. The other boys were carefully trained in all games of skill, in boxing, wrestling, spear-throwing, back-breaking, and other athletic exercises. Kauahoa was very jealous of Kawelo's plaything, and asked his...
Page 177 - The boy said he was not so strong as he appeared to be, for he had the aid of many little long-whiskered people; his real power lay in spear-throwing and club-fighting. There was only one other young man who was his equal a youth from Ewa, whose name was Kaeleha. Kawelo sent for this man and took him into his family. They dwelt for some time, cultivating the place where the royal lands now lie, back of the Waikiki beach. One day they heard great shouting and clapping of hands on the beach, and...
Page 183 - This Kane was one of the gods of Kawelo. Kawelo, according to one legend, had his people tie him in a mat as if dead as they approached Wailua, the home of Aikanaka. The beach was covered with people the warriors of Aikanaka. As the double canoe came to the beach, the people made ready to attack. They waited, however, for the newcomers to land and prepare for fight. This was a formal courtesy always demanded by the ethics of the long ago. When all was ready, Kamalama stood by the apparently dead...
Page 204 - ... thought it should be kept and brought to life. Kapalama, coming at this time, took the egg, wrapped it carefully in soft kapas, bade farewell to her daughter, and returned to Oahu. Here she had her husband build a fine thatched house of the best grass he could gather. The kapas put inside for beds and clothing were perfumed by fragrant ginger flowers, hala blossoms, and the delicate bloom of the cocoanut, while festoons of the sweet-scented maile graced its walls. For a long time that egg lay...
Page 218 - ... comprising large fish ponds, and taro and sweet potato lands, held by the servants of the vanquished god. These he placed under the charge of his father's own faithful chiefs and made his father once more king over the lands from which he had been driven. KAUILANI FINDS HIS SISTER LEPEAMOA For some time after the famous battle with the evil god, Kauilani aided his parents in establishing a firm and peaceful government, after which he became restless and wanted new experiences. One day he asked...
Page 184 - Naulu the seven breadfruit trees were afraid and retreated to the boat. Two noble chiefs asked Aikanaka for two large bodies of men (two four hundreds), but Kawelo and his handful of helpers defeated them with great slaughter. Thus several larger bodies of soldiers were destroyed, and Aikanaka became cold and afraid in his heart. Then Kahakaloa, the best skilled in the use of war-sticks in all the islands, rose up and went down with the two hundred warriors to fight with Kawelo and his family....
Page 173 - Kawelos are named in the legends of the Islands of Oahu and Kauai, but one only was the strong, the mighty warrior who destroyed a gigantic enemy who used trees for spears. He was known as Kawelo-leiMakua when mentioned in the genealogies.
Page 218 - She told him the story of his sister, who had been born in an egg and had become a very beautiful young woman. They had never seen her, because she had been taken to Oahu by her grandparents and there brought up. Kauilani said: "I am going to Oahu to find her." His mother said: "Yes, that is right. I will tell you about my people and their lands.

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