The Worcester Magazine and Historical Journal, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Page 278 - To the end the body of the commons may be preserved of honest and good men, it was ordered and agreed, that, for the time to come, no man shall be admitted to the freedom of this body politic, but such as are members of some of the churches within the limits of the same.
Page 249 - I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the separation ; but the separation having been made, and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States as an independent power.
Page 7 - If he who makes two blades of grass grow where but one grew before...
Page 327 - Blessed are the peace makers : for they shall be called the children of God, Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness' sake : for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Page 210 - Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus Christ, that great Shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant...
Page 247 - I was the focus of all eyes. I was relieved, however, from the embarrassment of it, by the Swedish and Dutch ministers, who came to me and entertained me with a very agreeable conversation during the whole time.
Page 249 - The king then asked me whether I came last from France ; and upon my answering in the affirmative, he put on an air of familiarity, and, smiling, or rather laughing, said, ' There is an opinion among some people that you are not the most attached of all your countrymen to the manners of France.
Page 249 - I was the last to conform to the separation: but the separation having been made, and having become inevitable, I have always said as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States as an independent power. The moment I see such sentiments and language as yours prevail, and a disposition to give this country the preference, that moment I shall say, let the circumstances of language, religion, and blood, have their natural and full effect.
Page 250 - The King then said a word or two to the secretary of state, which, being between them, I did not hear, and then turned round and bowed to me, as is customary with all kings and princes when they give the signal to retire. I retreated, stepping...
Page 306 - That state that will give liberty of conscience in matters of religion must give liberty of conscience and conversation in their moral laws, or else the fiddle will be out of tune, and some of the strings crack.

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