From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology

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Psychology Press, 1991 - Social Science - 490 pages
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Max Weber (1864-1920) was one of the most prolific and influential sociologists of the twentieth century. This classic collection draws together his key papers. This edition contains a new preface by Professor Bryan S. Turner.
  

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Contents

A Biographical View
3
Political Concerns
32
Intellectual Orientations
45
Marx and Weber
46
a Philosophy of History
51
Methods of Social Science
55
The Sociology of Ideas and Interests
61
Social Structures and Types of Capitalism
65
The Sociology of Charismatic Authority
245
Foundations and Instability of Charismatic Authority
248
Charismatic Kingship
251
The Meaning of Discipline
253
The Origins of Discipline in War
255
The Discipline of LargeScale Economic Organizations
261
Discipline and Charisma
262
RELIGION
265

Conditions of Freedom and the Image of Man
70
SCIENCE AND POLITICS
75
Politics as a Vocation
77
Science as a Vocation
129
POWER
157
Structures of Power
159
The Economic Foundations ofImperilaism
162
The Nation
171
Class Status Party
180
Determination of ClassSituation by MarketSituation
181
Communal Action Flowing from Class Interest
183
Types of Class Struggle
184
Status Honor
186
Guarantees of Status Stratification
187
Ethnic Segregation and Caste
188
Status Privileges
190
Economic Conditions and Effects of Status Stratification
192
Parties
194
Bureacracy
196
The Position of the Official
198
The Presuppositions and Causes of Bureaucracy
204
The Quantitative Development of Administrative Tasks
209
Qualitative Changes of Administrative Tasks
212
Technical Advantages of Bureaucratic Organization
214
Bureaucracy and Law
216
The Concentration of the Means of Administration
221
The Leveling of Social Differences
224
The Permanent Character of the Bureaucratic Machine
228
Economic and Social Consequences of Bureaucracy
230
The Power Position of Bureaucracy
232
Stages in the Development of Bureaucracy
235
The Rationalization of Education and Training
240
The Social Psychology of the World Religions
267
The Protestant Sects and the Spirit of Capitalism
302
Religious Rejections of the World and Their Directions
323
Typology of Asceticism and of Mysticism
324
Directions of the Abnegation of the World
327
The Economic Sphere
331
The Political Sphere
333
The Esthetic Sphere
340
The Erotic Sphere
343
The Intellectual Sphere
350
The Three Forms of Theodicy
358
SOCIAL STRUCTURES
361
Capitalism and Rural Society in Germany
363
National Character and the Junkers
386
The Brahman and the Castes
396
Caste and Tribe
398
Caste and Guild
399
Caste and Status Group
405
The Social Rank Order of the Castes in General
409
Castes and Traditionalism
411
The Chinese Literati
416
Confucius
421
The Development of the Examination System
422
The Typological Position of Confucian Education
426
The StatusHonor of the Literati
434
The Gentleman Ideal
436
The Prestige of Officialdom
438
Views on Economic Policy
440
Sultanism and the Eunuchs as Political Opponents of the Literati
442
Notes
445
Index
469
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About the author (1991)

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization---what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim---they seem not to have known each other's work---he created modern sociology.

Linda Gerth works with international students at the University of Notre Dame. Having learned to quilt under the tutelage of her grandmother and mother, she enjoys collaborating with her mother on quilting projects. She lives in South Bend, Indiana.

C. Wright Mills, an American sociologist, was one of the most controversial social scientists of the mid-twentieth century. He considered himself a rebel against both the academic establishment and American society in general, and he rarely tried to separate his radical ideas from his teaching and writing. Irving Louis Horowitz summarized much of Mills's ideas in the subtitle of his biography of him: An American Utopian. Mill's most traditional sociological study is The Puerto Rican Journey. His most direct attack on his colleagues in sociology is The Sociological Imagination (1959) (which he found left much to be desired). His most ideological work is The Power Elite (1956), an attempt to explain the overall power structure of the United States. Mills thought that the dominant "value-free" methodology of American sociology was an ideological mask, hiding values that he did not share. According to his younger colleague Immanuel Wallerstein, Mills was essentially a utopian reformer who thought that knowledge properly used could bring about a better society.

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