The Western Journal of Medicine and Surgery, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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Prentice & Weissinger, 1842 - Medicine
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Page 113 - TREATISE ON FOOD AND DIET: With Observations on the Dietetical Regimen suited for Disordered States of the Digestive Organs ; and an Account of the Dietaries of some of the principal Metropolitan and other Establishments for Paupers, Lunatics, Criminals, Children, the Sick, &c. By JON. PEREIRA, MDFRS & LS Author of
Page 371 - The amount of tissue metamorphosed in a given time may be measured by the quantity of nitrogen in the urine. The sum of the mechanical effects produced in two individuals, in the same temperature, is proportional to the amount of nitrogen in their urine ; whether the mechanical force has been employed in voluntary or involuntary motions, whether it has been consumed by the limbs or by the heart and other viscera.
Page 346 - ... or exertion of any kind, on the temperature of the air, and, finally, on the presence or absence of water. Through the skin and lungs there escapes a certain quantity of water, and as the presence of water is essential to the continuance of the vital motions, its dissipation hastens death.
Page 358 - Grain and other nutritious vegetables yield us, not only in starch, sugar, and gum, the carbon which protects our organs from the action of oxygen, and produces in the organism the heat which is essential to life, but also in the form of vegetable fibrine, albumen, and caseine, our blood, from which the other parts of our body are developed.
Page 344 - In the animal body, the food is the fuel : with a proper supply of oxygen, we obtain the heat given out during its oxidation or combustion. In winter, when we take exercise in a cold atmosphere, and when, consequently, the amount of inspired oxygen increases, the necessity for food containing carbon...
Page 132 - How beautifully and admirably simple, with the aid of these discoveries, appears the process of nutrition in animals, the formation of their organs, in which vitality chiefly resides ! Those vegetable principles, which in animals are used to form blood, contain the chief constituents of blood, fibrine and albumen, ready formed, as far as regards their composition. All plants, besides, contain a certain quantity of iron, which reappears in the colouring matter of the blood.
Page 250 - As his constant food is beef and water, his constitution is so strong that he is able to endure great fatigue; and the distances he will ride, and the number of hours that he will remain on horseback, would hardly be credited.
Page 14 - Encyclopaedia of Materia Medica. Edited, with Additions, by JOSEPH CARSON, MD, Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacy in the University of Pennsylvania. In two very large octavo volumes of 2100 pages, on small type, with about 500 illustrations on stone and wood, strongly bound in leather, with raised bands.
Page 370 - The sum of force available for mechanical purposes must be equal to the sum of the vital forces of all tissues adapted to the change of matter.' ' If, in equal times, unequal quantities of oxygen are consumed, the result is obvious, in an unequal amount of heat liberated, and of mechanical force.' ' When unequal amounts of mechanical force are expended this determines the absorption of corresponding and unequal quantities of oxygen.
Page 216 - The Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology of the Human Teeth ; with the Most Approved Methods of Treatment.

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