Emma: A Novel. In Three Volumes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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John Murray, 1816 - England
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Contents

I
1
II
22
III
34
IV
47
V
70
VI
83
VII
101
VIII
117
X
175
XI
192
XII
206
XIII
227
XIV
247
XV
263
XVI
285
XVII
298

IX
144
XVIII
306

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Page 1 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 36 - Miss Bates stood in the very worst predicament in the world for having much of the public favour, and she had no intellectual superiority to make atonement to herself, or frighten those who might hate her, into outward respect.
Page 81 - She always declares she will never marry, which, of course, means just nothing at all. But. I have no idea that she has yet ever seen a man she cared for. It would not be a bad thing for her to be very much in love with a proper object. I should like to see Emma in love, and in some doubt of a return : it would do her good. But there is nobody hereabouts to attach her ; and she goes so seldom from home.
Page 183 - ... personal attention and kindness, her counsel and her patience, as from her purse. She understood their ways, could allow for their ignorance and their temptations, had no romantic expectations of extraordinary virtue from those for whom education had done so little, entered into their troubles with ready sympathy, and always gave her assistance with as much intelligence as good-will.
Page 312 - There is one thing, Emma, which a. man can always do, if he chuses, and that is, his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution. It is Frank Churchill's duty to pay this attention to his father.
Page 19 - ... talk of success? where is your merit? What are you proud of? You made a lucky guess; and that is all that can be said.
Page 14 - Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse, and the only one who ever told her of them.
Page 41 - She was a very pretty girl, and her beauty happened to be of a sort which Emma particularly admired. She was short, plump and fair, with a fine bloom, blue eyes, light hair, regular features, and a look of great sweetness...
Page 87 - ... exercise so charming a talent in favour of your friend. I know what your drawings are. How could you suppose me ignorant? Is not this room rich in specimens of your landscapes and flowers ? and has not Mrs. Weston some inimitable figurepieces in her drawing-room at Randalls...
Page 292 - The first error and the worst lay at her door. It was foolish, it was wrong, to take so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick of what ought to be simple. She was quite concerned and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more.

References from web pages

Bookride: Emma. Jane Austen. 1816.
EMMA. A novel. In Three Volumes. By the author of "Pride and Prejudice" &c. &c. John Murray, London 1816. Current Selling Prices $15000-$40000 /£7000-£20000 ...
www.bookride.com/ 2007/ 04/ emma-jane-austen-1816.html

Rare First Edition of Emma by Jane Austen
Emma: A Novel in Three Volumes, by the Author of "Pride and Prejudice." London: Printed for John Murray, 1816. 12mo, contemporary three-quarter calf ...
www.theworldsgreatbooks.com/ emma.htm

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