Castles in Ireland: Feudal Power in a Gaelic World

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Psychology Press, 2000 - Social Science - 261 pages
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The castles of Ireland are an essential part of the study of medieval Europe, but were, until recently, a subject neglected by scholars. A lord's power and prestige were displayed in the majesty and uniqueness of his castle. The remains of several thousand castles enable us to reconstruct life in Ireland during these crucial centuries.
Castles in Ireland tells the story of the nature and development of lordship and power in medieval Ireland. Ireland formed the setting to the interplay of the differing roles of competing lordship: English and Irish; feudal European and Gaelic; royal and baronial. Tom McNeill argues that the design of the castles contest the traditional view of Ireland as a land torn by war and divided culturally between the English and Irish.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Before 1166
7
Early castles of stone
17
Early castles of earth and timber
56
Castles and the establishing of English lordships in Ireland
75
The central period of English lordship
81
Castles in a divergent tradition
119
Lesser stone castles
148
Castles of the Irish
157
Summary
165
The fourteenth century
171
dates and distribution
201
structure and use
211
The later middle ages and the end of castles in Ireland
224
Copyright

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