Citizenship and Identity in Turkey: From Atatürk's Republic to the Present Day

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I.B.Tauris, Jun 15, 2012 - History - 292 pages
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Is Turkish nationalism simply a product of Kemalist propaganda from the early Turkish Republic or an inevitable consequence of a firm and developing "Turkish" identity? How do the politics of nationalism and identity limit Turkey's progression towards a fuller, more institutionalized democracy? Turkish citizenship is a vital aspect of today's Republic, and yet it has long been defined only through legal framework, neglecting its civil, political, and social implications. Here, Basak Ince seeks to rectify this, examining the identity facets of citizenship, and how this relates to nationalism, democracy, and political participation in the modern Turkish republic. By tracing the development of the citizenship from the initial founding of the Republic to the immediate post-World War II period, and from the military interventions of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s to the present day, she offers in-depth analysis of the interaction of state and society in modern Turkey, which holds wider implications for the study of the Middle East.

  

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Contents

THE THEORETICAL BACKGROUND
19
THE SINGLEPARTY PERIOD 192346
39
THE TRANSITION TO THE MULTIPARTY PERIOD
87
MILITARY INTERVENTIONS AND CONSTITUTIONAL
113
REMAPPING TURKISH IDENTITY 19802010
137
ANALYSIS
183
AppendixA
197
Bibliography
257
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About the author (2012)

Basak Ince is Instructor of Political Science at Bilkent University. Educated at Bilkent University and the LSE, she holds a PhD in Politics from SOAS.

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