The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality

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Psychology Press, 1996 - Philosophy - 230 pages
2 Reviews
In a career spanning sixty years, Sir Karl Popper has made some of the most important contributions to the twentieth century discussion of science and rationality. The Myth of the Framework is a new collection of some of Popper's most important material on this subject.
Sir Karl discusses such issues as the aims of science, the role that it plays in our civilization, the moral responsibility of the scientist, the structure of history, and the perennial choice between reason and revolution. In doing so, he attacks intellectual fashions (like positivism) that exagerrate what science and rationality have done, as well as intellectual fashions (like relativism) that denigrate what science and rationality can do. Scientific knowledge, according to Popper, is one of the most rational and creative of human achievements, but it is also inherently fallible and subject to revision.
In place of intellectual fashions, Popper offers his own critical rationalism - a view that he regards both as a theory of knowlege and as an attitude towards human life, human morals and democracy.
Published in cooperation with the Central European University.
  

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Popper's history of European science is entirely wrong from the beginning to its conclusion. Taking Francis Bacon Verulam for one of the godfathers of the industrial revolution does proof that Popper did not read Bacon's books in which he is constantly remaining that technology IS NOT science, that ingeneers are not scientists; completed by the idea that mathematics (very useful for ingeneers), is not a scientific language. And in fact, we know from Ancient Aegyptian civilization that mathematics is closer to religion than science.
Is this for whitening other philosophers such as Galileo or French Descartes who worked for the weapon industry that Popper is charging Bacon?
Therefore, describing in 'New Atlantis' every technologies that were built after him is for Bacon a way to show that there is no discovery in technology but just materials.
 

Review: The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality

User Review  - Mimi Reem - Goodreads

"The difference with the other is the most vital issues of humanity through history, however few philosophers who discussed the search for solutions and realistic - This is an important book for anyone who wants to debate - persuasion and persuasion - and coexistence with different" Read full review

Contents

THE MYTH OF THE FRAMEWORK
33
REASON OR REVOLUTION?
65
PROBLEMS AIMS RESPONSIBILITIES
82
PHILOSOPHY AND PHYSICS
112
A PLURALIST APPROACH TO THE
130
MODELS INSTRUMENTS AND TRUTH
154
EPISTEMOLOGY AND INDUSTRIALIZATION
185
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About the author (1996)

Although he writes widely in philosophy, Sir Karl Raimund Popper is best known for his thesis that an empirical statement is meaningless unless conditions can be specified that could show it to be false. He was born and educated in Vienna, where he was associated with, although not actually a member of, the Vienna Circle. Two years after the German publication of his Logic of Scientific Discovery (1935), he left Austria for New Zealand, where he was senior lecturer at the University of Canterbury. In 1945 he moved to England and began a distinguished career at the London School of Economics and Political Science. According to Popper, there is no "method of discovery" in science. His view holds that science advances by brilliant but unpredictable conjectures that then stand up well against attempts to refute them. This view was roundly criticized by more dogmatic positivists, on the one hand, and by Feyerabend and Kuhn, on the other. In 1945 he published The Open Society and Its Enemies, which condemns Plato, Georg Hegel, and Karl Marx as progenitors of totalitarianism and opponents of freedom. The scholarship that underpins this book remains controversial. Popper's later works continue his interest in philosophy of science and also develop themes in epistemology and philosophy of mind. He is particularly critical of historicism, which he regards as an attitude that fosters a deplorable tendency toward deterministic thinking in the social sciences.

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