Lives of the Italian Poets, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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E. Bull, 1832 - Poets, Italian
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Page 280 - Quell' angelico, altero, e dolce volto, II freddo sangue intorno al core accolto Lascia senza color la faccia mia : Poi mirando la sua, mi par si pia, Ch'io prendo ardire, e torna il valor tolto Amor ne...
Page 374 - A poco a poco si fu intabaccato A questo giuoco, e le risa cresceva ; Tanto che '1 petto avea tanto serrato, Che si volea sfibbiar, ma non poteva, Per modo egli par essere impacciato: Questa bertuccia se gli rimetteva : Allor le risa Margutte raddoppia, E finalmente per la pena scoppia.
Page 374 - Morgante, sentendo e' si cruccia : Margutte pure al fin gli ha ritrovati ; E vede che gli ha presi una bertuccia, E prima se gli ha messi, e poi cavati : Non domandar se le risa gli smuccia, Tanto che gli occhi son tutti gonfiati, E par che gli schizzassin fuor di testa : E stava pure a veder questa festa.
Page 313 - The facility with which he turned from subjects of the highest importance to those of amusement and levity, suggested to his countrymen the idea that he had two distinct souls combined in one body. Even his moral character seems to have partaken in some degree of the same diversity, and his devotional poems are as ardent as his lighter pieces are licentious. On all sides, he touched the extremes of human character, and the powers of his mind were only bounded by that impenetrable circle which prescribes...
Page 70 - This sublimity, it is true, is far from being constantly sustained, and the verse not unfrequently falls off into a style as cold and harsh as it is obscure and unaffecting. But in the first place, it was not possible that he should be always alike elevated ; and in the next, both the object of his poem, the learning which filled his mind, and the literary taste of the age, would lead him into most of the faults which disfigure the Commedia in the eye of a modern reader.
Page 312 - ... human estimation. The facility with which he turned from subjects of the highest importance to those of amusement and levity, suggested to his countrymen the idea that he had two distinct souls combined in one body.
Page 313 - To be absorbed in one pursuit, however important, is not the characteristic of the higher class of genius, which, piercing through the various combinations and relations of surrounding circumstances, sees all things in their just dimensions, and attributes to each its due. Of the various occupations in which Lorenzo engaged, there is not one in which he was not eminently successful ; but he was most particularly distinguished in those which justly hold the first rank in human estimation. The facility...
Page 279 - Her sentiments were always just and striking, and have furnished materials for some of my sonnets ; she always spoke at the proper time, and always to the purpose, so that nothing could be added, nothing taken away. Though her remarks were often keen and pointed, yet they were so tempered as not to give offence.
Page 363 - Quivi vivande di molte ragioni, pavoni e starne e leprette e fagiani, cervi e conigli e di grassi capponi, e vino ed acqua, per bere e per mani.
Page 71 - ... is audible ; but the sensible perception of these things is overpowered by the sublimer spiritual feeling which the moral grandeur of his sentiments never fails to inspire. Dante equalled Milton in the one respect, but not in the other, which gave to the English bard a diviner character than was ever attained by any other mortal poet.

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