Frank and Fanny: a rural story (Google eBook)

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Phillips, Sampson, 1851 - American fiction - 160 pages
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Page 55 - ... prayer. Thy favour gives me daily bread, And friends, who all my wants supply ; And safely now I rest my head, Preserved and guarded by thine eye. Look down in pity, and forgive Whate'er I've said or done amiss ; And help me, every day I live, To serve thee better than on this. Now, while I speak, be pleased to take A helpless child beneath thy care ; And condescend, for JESUS' sake, To listen to my evening prayer.
Page 54 - LORD, I have passed another day, And come to thank Thee for Thy care ; Forgive my faults in work and play, And listen to my evening prayer. Thy favour gives me daily bread, And friends, who all my wants supply ; And safely now I rest my head, Preserved and guarded by Thine eye. Look down in pity, and forgive Whate'er I've said or done amiss ; And help me every day I live, To serve Thee better than on this.
Page 100 - For 'twas I that had the pleasure, Your nestlings to destroy. " But I did not think their mother Her little ones would miss, Or ever come to hail me With a wailing sound like this. " I did not know your bosom Was formed to suffer woe, And to mourn your murdered children, Or I had not grieved you so.
Page 100 - For 'twas I that thought it pleasure Your nestlings to destroy. " But I did not think their mother Her little ones would miss, Or ever come to hail me With a wailing sound like this.
Page 99 - ve sought them far and wide " I left them well this morning, When I went to seek their food ; But I found, upon returning, I 'da nest without a brood. " O, have you nought to tell me, That will ease my aching breast, About my tender offspring That I left within the nest ? " I have called them in the bushes, And the rolling stream beside, Yet they came not to my bidding, J 'm afi-aid they all have died...
Page 29 - the otter brings forth four or five at a time," but docs not mention the month. In Daniels' Rural Sports, it is said to " bring forth four or five young at a time, about the month of June." Jenyns says, " breeds in March . . . and produces four or five at a birth ;" and lastly, Bell gives March or April as the time, and three to five as the number of young ones. The result of my experience, which has been confined almost exclusively to Norfolk, is, that...
Page 3 - To inculcate gentleness of disposition, pa tience, and benevolence, and to inspire the young with a love for the simple pleasures of rural life, is the purpose of the following story. The love of exciting narratives is not favourable to the developement of those mild virtues which are the most beautiful ornaments of youth ; and, in the following pages, the quiet scenes and simple characters of rural life solicit attention, in preference to the hairbreadth 'scapes and marvellous adven(3) tures which...
Page 19 - ... of mountain streams, which abound with small fish and insects, his accustomed fare. When the fish do not approach his station, he flies along, just over the water, and occasionally hovers with rapidly moving wings over the spot where he sees a trout or minnow. In the next instant, descending with a quick spiral sweep, he seizes a fish, with which he rises to his post and swallows it in an instant. All these proceedings were watched...
Page 57 - ROBIN. was shaking the dew in showers from the leaves, with every motion of his restless little wings. She sprang out upon the floor, fancying for a moment, that it was her chick-a-dee, that was singing so merrily ; and she hastened to the basket, and carefully lifted the wool. She was grievously disappointed, for the poor bird lay stretched upon its back, and when she lifted it, she found it was quite cold and dead I Her little bosom swelled, and large tears gushed from her eyes.
Page 93 - V. JACK MILLS. I SHOULD not omit to tell you, Mrs. Hamilton was bringing Fanny up to be very industrious, both with her sewing and knitting, and Mr. Hamilton taught Frank to weed the garden, and saw wood, and gather chips ; and the children were as busy as bees, when at work, and as happy as birds, when at play. I have told you that Frank seldom played with any one beside his sister...

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