Classical comedy

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Penguin, Sep 28, 2006 - Drama - 289 pages
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The ideal single-volume introduction to the greatest masterpieces of ancient comedy

From the fifth to the second century B.C., theatrical comedy flourished in Greece and Rome. This new anthology brings together four essential masterworks of the genre: Aristophanes¬' bold, imaginative The Birds; Menander¬'s The Girl from Samos, which explores popular contemporary themes of mistaken identity and sexual misbehavior; and two later Roman comic plays¬óPlautus¬'s The Brothers Menaechmus, the inspiration for Shakespeare¬'s The Comedy of Errors; and Terence¬'s bawdy yet sophisticated double love plot, The Eunuch. Together, these four plays capture the genius of classical comedy for students, theatergoers, actors, lovers of satire, and anyone interested in the ancient world.

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Contents

Chronology
ix
Introduction
xv
Further Reading
li
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Little is known about Aristophanes' life (c. 445BC-c.386BC), but there is a portrait of him in Plato's Symposium. His first comedy was produced when he was 20 and he wrote 40 plays in the course of his life.

Erich Segal has taught Classics at Harvard, Yale and Princeton and is currently an Honorary Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford. He has published widely on Greek and Roman Comedy, his latest book, The Death of Comedy, was published in 2001. He is also the author of nine best-selling novels.

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