Authorial Conquests: Essays on Genre in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Line Cottegnies, Nancy Weitz
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 238 pages
1 Review
This collection of essays by leading scholars offers the first substantial study of Margaret Cavendish's innovative use of genre and tries to render justice to her extraordinary authorial ambition. The thoroughness of Cavendish's literary project was formiddable: she set out to build up a large body of work by systematic conquest of the major seveneenth-century genres, questioning their codes and conventions, while reflecting on her own practice. Many of her works strike readers as chaotic, but a consistent poetics does emerge once we acknowledge that humanistic ideals of order and symmetry are not her aim; they require a hybrid perspective, and it bears evidence to their complexity and modernity that they still challenge readers' responses and practices today. The eleven contributions to this volume are interdisciplinary and multinational and represent a variety of modern critical approaches to the problems of placing Cavendish's generic explorations in the context of contemporary literary and philosophical history.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
7
Genre and the Exilic Self
23
Cavendishs Critique of Hobbes in the Philosophical Letters
40
Anecdotal and Cabalistic Forms in Observations upon Experimental Philosophy
59
Margaret Cavendishs Life of William Plutarch and Mixed Genre
80
The Mythical Structure of Margaret Cavendishs Autobiographical Narrative
103
Margaret Cavendishs Poetics of Variety
123
Romantic Fiction Moral Anxiety and Social Capital in Cavendishs Assaulted and Pursued Chastity
145
The Lucianic Voice of Margaret Cavendishs Description of a New World Called the Blazing World
161
Margaret Cavendish and the Possibilities of Drama
179
the Dramatic SelfFashioning of Margaret Cavendish
195
An Aesthetic of Fragmentation
213
Notes on Contributors
229
Index
233
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Line Cottegnies teaches English literature at the University of Paris 8--Saint-Denis. Nancy Weitz is a tutor in English and a learning technologist at the University of Oxford.

Bibliographic information