Two Discourses of the Navy, 1638 and 1659, (Google eBook)

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Navy Records Society, 1896 - Great Britain - 419 pages
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John Hollond had a chequered career as a naval administrator, punctuated by his charges of corruption against his colleagues, circulated in these two manuscripts, and their counter-charges against him, but his Discourses are uniquely informative. There is also printed Sir Robert Slyngesbie's Discourse of the Navy, written in 1660 when he had just become Controller for the information of of Charles II, and a number of other documents which amplify or explain Hollond's narrative.
  

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Page viii - SOCIETY desire it to be understood that they are not answerable for any opinions or observations that may appear in the Society's publications; the Editors of the several Works being alone responsible for the same.
Page 179 - and more especially seamen, love their bellies above anything else, and therefore it must always be remembered, in the management of the victualling of the navy, that to make any abatement from them in the quantity or agreeableness of the victuals, is to discourage and provoke them in the tenderest point, and will sooner render them disgusted with the King's service than any one other hardship that can be put upon them.
Page 153 - ... the week, one quarter of stock-fish, half a quarter of a pound of butter, and a quarter of a pound of cheese, except that on Friday only one meal of fish, butter, and cheese was allowed.
Page 50 - were not liable to it,' ' poor patient labouring men and housekeepers,'3 and he adds ' it is a great tyranny.' The redoubtable Commissioner Middleton, writing from Portsmouth on 29 March, 1666, tells Pepys that he is ashamed to see such pressed men as are sent from Devonshire one with the falling sickness and a lame arm ; another with dead palsy on one side and not any use of his right arm4.
Page 4 - If either the honour of a nation, commerce or trade with all nations, peace at home, grounded upon our enemies' fear or love of us abroad, and attended with plenty of all things necessary either for the preservation of the public weal or thy private welfare, be things worthy thy esteem (though it may be beyond thy shoal conceit), then next to God and the King give thy thanks for the same to the navy, as the principal instrument whereby God works these good things to thee. As for honour, who knows...
Page 225 - ... it may be had to do it in two years, if private persons will let it be felled when occasion [requires]; besides the first and second-rates above mentioned I conceive it very difficult, if not impossible, to find compass timber, knees, standards, stems, harpins, &c, to build twenty third-rates in four years, stripping all the forests and gentlemen's timber within twenty miles of any land or water carriage or navigable place of England; for straight timber, if the gentlemen will fell, I suppose...
Page 107 - I have seen all the works that are done under the sun; and behold, all is vanity and vexation of spirit. That which is crooked cannot be made straight: and that which is wanting cannot be numbered.
Page xliv - In the late Queen's time many thousands did miscarry by the corruption as well of drink as of meat...
Page 107 - They that forsake the law praise the wicked : but such as keep the law contend with them.
Page 179 - Englishmen," wrote Pepys in his Naval Minutes, "and more especially seamen, love their bellies above anything else, and therefore it must always be remembered, in the management of the victualling of the navy, that to make any abatement from them in the quantity or...