The Livingstons of Livingston Manor: Being the History of that Branch of the Scottish House of Callendar which Settled in the English Province of New York During the Reign of Charles the Second; and Also Including an Account of Robert Livingston of Albany, "The Nephew," a Settler in the Same Province and His Principal Descendants (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Knickerbocker Press, 1910 - 590 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
15
III
33
IV
55
V
74
VI
78
VII
105
VIII
114
XI
158
XII
195
XIII
225
XIV
308
XV
353
XVI
382
XVII
394
XVIII
450

IX
132
X
144

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 440 - We too are citizens of America. Carolina is one of these proud States; her arms have defended, her best blood has cemented, this happy Union. And then add, if you can, without horror and remorse, This happy Union we will dissolve; this picture of peace and prosperity we will deface; this free intercourse we will interrupt; these fertile fields we will deluge with blood; the protection of that glorious flag we renounce; the very name of Americans we discard.
Page 441 - The laws of the United States must be executed. I have no discretionary power on the subject; my duty is emphatically pronounced in the Constitution. Those who told you that you might peaceably prevent their execution deceived you; they could not have been deceived themselves. They know that a forcible opposition could alone prevent the execution of the laws, and they know that such opposition must be repelled. Their object is disunion. But be not deceived by names. Disunion by armed force is treason.
Page 219 - July last past, unanimously resolve that the reasons assigned by the Continental Congress for declaring the united colonies free and independent states are cogent and conclusive ; and that, while we lament the cruel necessity which has rendered that measure unavoidable, we approve the same, and will, at the risk of our lives and fortunes, join with the other colonies in supporting it.
Page 134 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground ; Another race the following spring supplies ; They fall successive, and successive rise : So generations in their course decay; So flourish these when those are pass'd away.
Page 440 - ... foreign power. If your leaders could succeed in establishing a separation, what would be your situation? Are you united at home?
Page 211 - It appearing, in the course of these debates, that the colonies of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and South Carolina, were not yet matured for falling from the parent stem, but that they were fast advancing to that state...
Page 499 - Front, flank, and rear, the squadrons sweep, To break the Scottish circle deep, That fought around their King. But yet, though thick the shafts as snow, Though charging knights like whirlwinds go, Though bill-men ply the ghastly blow, Unbroken was the ring ; The stubborn spear-men still made good Their dark impenetrable wood, Each stepping where his comrade stood, The instant that he fell.
Page 363 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low-water mark. It seals the union of two nations who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Page 374 - It will change vast solitudes into flourishing districts, and from this day the United States take their place among the powers of the first rank.
Page 155 - That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted right of Englishmen, that no taxes be imposed on them but with their own consent, given personally or by their representatives.

Bibliographic information