The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Methuen, 1896 - English poetry
2 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Lives of the Poets: Boxed Set

User Review  - Richard Epstein - Goodreads

It is not Johnson's fault that I am not included: I came along too late for that. Notwithstanding this unavoidable, but lamentable, omission, this is among the very greatest of biographical works, endlessly entertaining and informed by wisdom. Read full review

Review: The Lives of the Poets: Boxed Set

User Review  - Jonathan - Goodreads

The critical gold standard, of course, at the gold standard price of $650. Happily there are cheaper editions. Read full review

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 19 - He was of an advanced age, and I was only not a boy ; yet he never received my notions with contempt. He was a whig, with all the virulence and malevolence of his party ; yet difference of opinion did not keep us apart. I honoured him, and he endured me.
Page 148 - Looking tranquillity ! It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chilness to my trembling heart.
Page 163 - A New Version of the Psalms of David, fitted to the Tunes used in Churches...
Page 222 - ... and relieved. Sir Richard Steele, having declared in his favour with all the ardour of benevolence which constituted his character, promoted his interest with the utmost zeal, related his misfortunes, applauded his merit, took all the opportunities of recommending him, and asserted, that J ' the inhumanity of his mother had given him a right to find every good man his father.
Page 66 - The variable weather of the mind, the flying vapours of incipient madness, which from time to time cloud reason, without eclipsing it, it requires so much nicety to exhibit, that Addison seems to have been deterred from prosecuting his own design.
Page 104 - It was apparently his principal endeavour to avoid all harshness and severity of diction ; he is therefore sometimes verbose in his transitions and connections, and sometimes descends too much to the language of conversation ; yet if his language had been less idiomatical, it might have lost somewhat of its genuine Anglicism.
Page 88 - About things on which the public thinks long, it commonly attains to think right ; and of Cato it has been not unjustly determined, that it is rather a poem in dialogue than a drama, rather a succession of just sentiments in elegant language, than a representation of natural affections, or of any state probable or possible in human life. Nothing here excites or assuages emotion ; here is no magical power of raising fantastic terror or wild anxiety.
Page 184 - Besides being acted in London sixty-three days without interruption, and renewed the next season with equal applause, it spread into all the great towns of England ; was played in many places to the thirtieth and fortieth time ; at Bath and Bristol fifty, &c.
Page 30 - ... was expressed by a loud hum, continued in proportion to their zeal or pleasure. When Burnet preached, part of his congregation hummed so loudly and so long, that he sat down to enjoy it, and rubbed his face with his handkerchief. When Sprat preached, he likewise was honoured with the like animating hum ; but he stretched out his hand to the congregation, and cried, " Peace, peace, I pray you peace.
Page 20 - At this man's table I enjoyed many cheerful and instructive hours, with companions, such as are not often found with one who has lengthened, and one who has gladdened life; with Dr James, whose skill in physic will be long remembered; and with David Garrick, whom I hoped to have gratified with this character of our common friend. But what are the hopes of man! I am disappointed by that stroke of death, which has eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure.

Bibliographic information