Merrill's English History (Google eBook)

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Maynard, Merrill, & Company, 1904
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Page 159 - God and man have concurred to punish the wickedness of this time. And think not slightly of this advertisement ; but retire yourself into your country, where you may expect the event in safety. For, though there be no appearance of any stir, yet I say, they will receive a terrible blow this parliament ; and yet they shall not see who hurts them.
Page 320 - First William the Norman, then William his son ; Henry, Stephen, and Henry, then Richard and John. Next Henry the Third, Edwards one, two, and three, And again, after Richard, three Henrys we see.
Page 258 - There's some say that we wan, Some say that they wan, Some say that nane wan at a', man; But one thing I'm sure, That at Sheriffmuir A battle there was, which I saw, man; And we ran, and they ran, and they ran, and we ran, And we ran and they ran awa', man.
Page 125 - Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 63 - as I have no means of knowing what is best to be done, I will be guided by the luck which shall attend this spider. If the insect shall make another effort to fix its thread, and shall be successful, I will venture a seventh time to try my fortune in Scotland ; but if the spider shall fail I will go to the wars in Palestine, and never return to my native country more.
Page 152 - Mary's days to wonder; but chiefly when they saw that large diet was used in many of these so homely cottages, insomuch that one of no small reputation amongst them said after this manner: These English, quoth he, have their houses made of sticks and dirt, but they fare commonly so well as the king.
Page 146 - ... to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood even in the dust. I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king ! and of a king of England too...
Page 280 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy!
Page 110 - Had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, He would not have given me over in my grey hairs.
Page 62 - Highland mountains, where they were chased from one place of refuge to another, often in great danger, and suffering many hardships. The Bruce's wife, now Queen of Scotland, with several other ladies, accompanied her husband and his few followers during their wanderings. There was no other way of providing for them save by hunting and fishing. It was remarked, that...

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