The Recurring Dark Ages: Ecological Stress, Climate Changes, and System Transformation

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Rowman Altamira, 2007 - History - 295 pages
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In this modern era of global environmental crisis, Sing Chew provides a convincing analysis of a 5,000-year history of recurring human and environmental crises a Dark Ages significant in defining the relationship between nature and culture. The author's message about the coming Dark Ages, as human communities continue to reorganize to meet the contingencies of ecological scarcity and climate changes, is a must-read for those concerned with human interactions and environmental changes, including environmental anthropologists and historians, world historians, geographers, archaeologists, and environmental scientists.
  

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Contents

System Crisis
3
The Crises of the Bronze Age
19
Nature and Culture
21
Ecological Crisis and System Transformation
41
The Crisis of Antiquity
109
Intensification of Natural and Social System Relations
111
A Period of Darkness
139
System Transformation
167
From the Past to the Future Whither System Transformation?
169
Arboreal Pollen Influxes
191
Plantago Pollen Influxes
213
Arboreal and Nonarboreal Pollen Influxes Percentages
231
Bibliography
253
Index
285
About the Author
295
Copyright

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Page 262 - Settlement, Demographic, and Economic Patterns in the Highlands of Palestine in the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Periods and the Beginning of Urbanism.

About the author (2007)

Sing C. Chew is research scientist in the Department of Urban and Environmental Sociology, UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig-Halle, Leipzig, Germany; professor of sociology at Humboldt State University, Arcata, California; and founding editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Nature and Culture.

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