Mexican Americans in Wilmington

Front Cover
Arcadia Publishing, 2011 - History - 127 pages
0 Reviews
Under Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. flags, the Los Angeles harbor area has developed many industries and businesses that survived on Mexican labor, supporting families of Mexican origin for more than a century. Pioneering Mexican Americans have worked the railroads, fields, canneries, plants, refineries, waterfront, and family-owned businesses for generations, forming strong bonds and lifelong friendships. Active in the military and sports, as well as involved in the church and community, Mexican Americans have overcome poverty, hardships, and discrimination, retained cultural values and customs, intermarried and assimilated with other cultures, and become the largest ethnic group in Wilmington. Many of the early families still have relatives that live and work in Wilmington, with sons and daughters achieving successful careers in various realms. Through education, hard work, and determination, Wilmington's Mexican Americans have contributed extensively to the harbor's vibrant American way of life.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Acknowledgments
6
Family and Friends
19
School and Church
41
Places and Events
63
Work and Play
87
In War and Peace
115
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Author Olivia Cueva-Fernandez was born and raised in Wilmington. A retired educator at levels from kindergarten through college, she served for seven years as a Los Angeles City Library commissioner, the first Hispanic library commissioner in 120 years. She collected these evocative images from the early families and community groups to provide future generations with a retrospective window on the sacrifices and contributions of the Mexican Americans who have gone before them.

Bibliographic information